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Looks like The New York Times will have to recalibrate its president-o-meter. For five months they’ve been styling Joe Biden as the reincarnation of FDR, but he’s looking more and more like the second coming of Millard Fillmore — who came to leadership of the dominant Whig Party at exactly the moment it flew up the wazoo of history and vanished, ushering in a civil war.

FDR, you remember, was faced with a momentous systems failure, a crisis we came to call the Great Depression. I’m not sure we actually learned the lesson of that, despite thousands of books and PhD dissertations on the subject. The lesson: financial systems tend to expand and complexify at a more rapid rate than the larger economic systems of which they are a component. Their abstract operations seek to hide risk in hyper-complexity until hazard comes a’callin’ and then you discover that the actual money is not there.

The difference then (1929 – 1941) was that the greater US economy was fully outfitted for industrial production when its finance sector blew up. There was something solid underneath all that financial abstraction. We were all set up to manufacture products of value, many of them based on inventions developed here: cars, movies, airplanes, radios, you-name-it, new and exciting things that people wanted to buy. Our factories were all pretty much up-to-date and state-of-the-art then, too. Our oil supply, including the industry that pumped it out of the ground and moved it from points A to B, was the envy of the world. We had raw materials up the ying-yang. The whole kit was humming magnificently when Wall Street blew up, and next thing you know unemployment goes to twenty-five percent and nobody has any money and the luckless are building cardboard shanties in Central Park.

Of course, that was then and this is now. If you’re saying “boo-hoo,” I think you get the picture. That whole kit of industrial production is long gone, and we’re left in an economic slum of Chinese product “welfare” (stuff for treasury bonds) juiced on computer-driven hyper-complexity, decorated with junk enterprise like social media, streaming pornography, crypto-currency mining, and chicken nuggets — with a lot of deceptive and useless motion in the form of mass motoring to provide the illusion that this country is actually going somewhere… all with a poison Chinese Covid-19 cherry-on-top. This is the outfit that Joe Biden is ostensibly the president of.

Now along comes the curious case of the Colonial Pipeline shutdown. It’s especially interesting because the pipeline itself, while big (5,500 miles long, from refineries in Texas clear up to gas stations in New York), is itself not that complicated. It’s a tube that a few volatile liquids move through: gasoline, aviation fuel, diesel oil. It has a bunch of valves to regulate the flows of these liquids. Plus, some storage tank-farms. The valves are computerized. That seems to be the problem. There was no physical damage to the pipeline and its components. The software that runs it got hacked, reportedly a “ransom-ware” sting, where unknown actors get control of the software and won’t relinquish it unless a whole lot of cash gets forked over by some non-traceable electronic means of transfer. I imagine it’s this last point that Colonial and its hackers are haggling over now, which explains the failure to restart the otherwise undamaged pipeline. I also imagine, meanwhile, all kinds of private and government computer savants are trying like hell to hack the hack behind the scenes.

The Colonial Pipeline is easy-peasy compared to the financial system and the electric grid. If the first one gets hacked, the nation’s nominal wealth might disappear (yours included), and, anyway, the financial system itself is not just enormous and hyper-complex, but much of its complexity conceals the massive misrepresentation of vaporous entities for “money” and any stoppage of the flows of that “money,” and things purporting to derive from it, will reveal the black hole at the center of all that activity. Hear that giant sucking sound? That was your livelihood, your pension, and your legacy rushing by en route to zero.

The electric grid is sometimes referred to as “the biggest machine in the world.” Unlike the financial system, it’s not largely stoked on hyper-complex dishonesty, it’s just really old, and jerry-rigged, and held together with duct-tape and baling wire. Probably a few kids in a basement somewhere — not even enemies of the republic, necessarily — could initiate a software attack that causes a whole lot of damage to transformers and other vital components and starts a process that wrecks the whole darn thing. Taking down the grid would be, effectively, the end of civilization, at least for a while, maybe a long while, maybe for good.

The various voting systems that states such as Arizona, Georgia, Pennsylvania, and Michigan employ are child’s play compared to those monsters. And the funny part is: there was no good reason to over-complexify them except to queer elections. Dominion machines and Smartmatic software were hardly needed to tally votes and only invited opportunity to cheat. Paper ballots, pen-and-ink voter registration ledgers (like the ones still used in New York state precincts), and some dedicated board-of-election workers will get’er done in a straightforward manner that can be regulated easily. But, no-o-o-o, we had to heap unnecessary complexity on that, too, and look where it’s left us. We may find out soon.

So, the Colonial Pipeline breakdown should send a kind of grim message. The creatures who run the Federal Reserve, the banks, and the markets are standing by along with the poor souls who run the electric grid, chewing their fingernails down to the nubbins. It’s too late to simplify any of it. We’ve just got to roll with it, until it stops rolling.


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About James Howard Kunstler

View all posts by James Howard Kunstler
James Howard Kunstler is the author of many books including (non-fiction) The Geography of Nowhere, The City in Mind: Notes on the Urban Condition, Home from Nowhere, The Long Emergency and the four-book series of World Made By Hand novels, set in a post economic crash American future. His most recent book is Living in the Long Emergency; Global Crisis, the Failure of the Futurists, and the Early Adapters Who Are Showing Us the Way Forward. Jim lives on a homestead in Washington County, New. York, where he tends his garden and communes with his chickens.

1,517 Responses to “The Raptures of Hyper-Complexity” Subscribe

  1. Trean May 10, 2021 at 9:45 am #

    Of course Mr Buffet and other billionaires love this as fuel is now being tankered across the nation. They have a lot of money invested in the trucking and rail industries. Naturally gas prices will spike making extra profits for the refiners and for the government in taxes. A win win for everyone but the consumers, again.
    Nauturally president Houseplant tells us that we have to just get used to hacking attacks. Clueless old retard.

    • MrMangoOnMyShoulder May 10, 2021 at 11:59 am #

      Well, that would be your classic Problem/Reaction/Solution scheme in a nutshell.

      Of course they probably did this to themselves to gain on the other side of the table.

      They’ll probably get their soon-to-be-paid “ransom money” back from the insurance companies too, as well as receiving most of it back indirectly when they pay the “ransom” to their friend Bob Sacamano and his nephews in a Torrance basement.

    • tully May 10, 2021 at 6:37 pm #

      Wondering where the drivers for tanker trucks will come from? Supply was tight before covid, now around 1 in 8 OTR loads are delayed due to driver shortage.

      No idea what the current rail situation is.

      • MrMangoOnMyShoulder May 11, 2021 at 10:48 am #

        Good point. Guessing Warren B doesn’t have a Class A with hazardous materials certification.

        Actually probably hasn’t driven a car in forty years.

  2. Pete May 10, 2021 at 9:47 am #

    Colonial pipeline hack is a ruse…

    Got this…

    https://www.wcnc.com/article/news/local/ncdeq-colonial-pipeline-spill-huntersville/275-70e16fb6-c945-4634-b933-3975d0573f2e

    Apparently this pipeline is leaking.

    How convenient is it that they can shut it down for some other reason?

    • BeeGee May 10, 2021 at 10:43 am #

      Brilliant! Hadn’t seen this anywhere else.

    • draupnir May 10, 2021 at 11:05 am #

      I remember when the pipeline from up north ruptured below a suburb of St. Paul back in the ’80s. A wall of flame raced through a residential area. It looked like a scene from Hell. A woman trying to flee with her three-year-old child couldn’t run fast enough and was caught in it. She went out the front door, while her husband and another child went out the back and lived. The worst of it was that they didn’t die right away. This was in the days before HIPPA, and journalists being what they are, reported that the child became hysterical in the emergency room when the nurses wanted to take out her earrings, because they were new and her daddy told her not to take them out or the holes would close. The child has been dead for over thirty years and I still get choked up about it.

      • MrMangoOnMyShoulder May 10, 2021 at 12:02 pm #

        Good lord, thanks for that, um…uplifting story.

        Which St Paul suburb?

        • draupnir May 10, 2021 at 1:48 pm #

          It was Mounds View. Not too far from where I lived at the time. It was 1986. A 50-foot wall of flame erupted from the pipeline. The child who died was actually seven.

      • MrMangoOnMyShoulder May 10, 2021 at 1:50 pm #

        Ah, found it…Mounds View

    • MaryV May 13, 2021 at 9:22 am #

      Insane! Biggest spill in NC’s history and no coverage, and a cover-up?

  3. Pete May 10, 2021 at 10:00 am #

    Complexity is also a ruse.

    Do you really understand your phone bill?
    Ever argue with an auto mechanic?
    Medical – pullllleease.

    These are the diminishing returns of technology. A world so complex, only the high priests of technology (the current fascists) can understand and explain it all. Only the high priests of medicine can understand and explain it all. Only the high priests of government can understand and explain it all.

    It’s how they pull the wool over our eyes, every single time.

    At this point, a world made by hand is more a prayer than a novel.

    • tlauria May 10, 2021 at 10:38 am #

      Couldn’t agree more. I’ve been saying much the same things for years – the technology is not only out running us, it’s out running the engineers.

      Several months ago I had a problem with my phone as I traveled. Called T-Mobile and the tech desk gave me a story and a solution.

      Didn’t work. Another call to the tech desk gave me a completely different story and ANOTHER solution.

      Didn’t work…need I go on?

      Besides the obvious designed obsolescence, the tech is changing so rapidly and so often – needlessly I must add – that no techie knows what the hell they’re talking about.

      WMBH.

      • JohnAZ May 10, 2021 at 11:30 am #

        I graduated in 1976 in electrical engineering. It lasted ten years and I was obsolete. After being laid off, getting a new job is difficult.

        To the kids, it seems exciting, it is not, it has short term pay back, but plan on continuous re-education on your own. Engineering is short term gratification.

        • BackRowHeckler May 10, 2021 at 12:20 pm #

          New Mercedes Benz cars are too complex to be repaired by factory trained mechanics; electronics and computer experts often must be consulted or brought in to assist.

          • butter56 May 10, 2021 at 3:04 pm #

            So are F-150’s

          • Uncle Bob May 10, 2021 at 3:04 pm #

            Overly complex “systems” are bad enough, but sometimes they’re made worse by time, politics, and other human failings. My brother, a successful attorney (and shadetree mechanic), has been running all over Upstate New York and Northeast Pennsyltucky for months because his prized 7-series BMW is running on one bank of cylinders and nobody can find the proper software patch to get his baby running at full efficiency. One dealer told him no dealership in the United States can help him because they believe BMW deleted software for said car because it’s over 10 years old. Another of his cars is constantly being shopped because Petra Kelly and her Greens successfully changed laws so that certain parts in cooling systems that had been made of exotic alloys must be made of plastics instead. Guess what happens to plastics that are exposed to hot engine coolant?

          • megaculpa May 10, 2021 at 9:31 pm #

            One of my clients sells parts for older Land Rover trucks. Some of his customers’ trucks are over 50 years old and are still running. They are simple enough machines that owners can perform their own repairs and maintenance. They are indispensable vehicles in places like the Australian outback and the Canadian north where repair shops are non-existent.

        • David Webb May 10, 2021 at 3:51 pm #

          Even continuous re-education doesn’t always help. I trained as a COBOL mainframe programmer in the 80’s, and seeing the writing on the wall I spent much of the 90’s taking classes in newer technology. I remained employed with my old skills through the Y2K process, but after that I couldn’t find any companies that wanted to hire a 40+ programmer with no hands-on experience with coding for PCs. The years of classroom training were worthless.

          • Pete May 11, 2021 at 8:12 am #

            DB2, CICS and COBOL aren’t dead yet. Lot’s of F500 firms have big dependency on those mainframe systems. Hang in there, there’s work to be had in these systems.

          • rube-i-con May 11, 2021 at 8:57 am #

            rubbish, there are plenty of cobol jobs out there. i~m still programming in a language I was told was a dead end….in 1995!

            jeez, just do a search on any job site and lots of cobol db2 etc comes up.

            there~s a huge shortage of programmers, if you~re not up to speed on new languages just take a code bootcamp, some are even free if you don~t get a job offer for at least $50k following the 2-3 month course

        • SvrzoH May 10, 2021 at 4:34 pm #

          Profession of yours that phased out together with slide rule.

          Architects and engineers of today are literary slaves of Autodesk
          and their for ever “new update” AutoCAD.
          Comic anecdotes in hi-tech firms where engineers could not figure out how to use microwave in the lunch room.
          Tire pressure sensor light on our Ford. Me:no intention of paying to fix it. My wife: nervous breakdown watching it despite tires
          being in perfect order since I check it every fourth or fifth gas fill.

          So much to list.

          To this day amazed with “twisted logic’ of my engineering colleague’s with no shortage of “watch and learn” attitude, through most of my career, so…. no wonder.

          • abbybwood May 11, 2021 at 1:23 am #

            Just cover up that sensor light with a piece of camo tape and she’ll forget all about it.

          • ThorsHammer May 11, 2021 at 7:02 pm #

            SvrzoH

            I’ve managed several projects in Jackson Hole just downstream from where the deciders meet every year to plan the world’s future.

            Try to find an architect— especially one associated with the most prestigious firms— that understands that water runs downhill.

            Case in point: New 16 million dollar home just completed a few hundred yards from the base of the ski lifts. Crawl space basement with all the complex machinery to run the palace installed in it. Gravel floor placed a foot below the winter water table. $27,000 in mold remediation before the walls were even framed including an attempt to waterproof the basement from the inside that is a guaranteed fail.

            Or another: 18 million dollar house on a 32 acre plot south of town. Features a million dollar +++ in glass with sliding glass doors to open the entire Great Room to the outside. Except that the mosquitos are so ferocious that the sliding walls can never be opened in the summer. When the owners come up from Texas for Christmas the aren’t likely to open them because it is 30 below zero. And the roof is an inverted V with the rain and snow melt water running down through the walls. Leaks at the slightest sign of rain or ice damming.

            The project architect calls it “pushing the envelope.” I guess the envelope was too heavy to carry without a fork lift since their design fee pushed well past a million dollars.

            I’ve built megayacht engine rooms with more system complexity in them than a small city. Once I have the Autocad drawings I always build full scale mock-ups of all the actual machinery that I have to accommodate and shuffle them around until I know they will fit. Positively Neanderthal.

        • Epicur May 11, 2021 at 11:38 am #

          “I graduated in 1976 in electrical engineering.”

          Somewhat similarly, I graduated in a minerals associated program after falling for the oil scare in the ’70s. I had to totally re-invent my career in the ’80s using my basic engineering education as a foundation. I still make part of my income from mineral businesses, but more from others.

          “…plan on continuous re-education…”

          For sure.

    • sevensec May 12, 2021 at 2:47 am #

      Here’s where you’re wrong, I daresay–mostly, the Priests *don’t* actually understand or explain any of those things you mention, including those within their own specialty.

      Take the priestliest of preisthoods, medicine. When is the last time a doctor actually gave you a really useful and non-obvious diagnosis or treatment, rather than simply feeding you through the System and collecting some absurd fee for ordering unnecessary tests and procedures? Also, the rate of death by medical errors in the country, while not a recent development, is still a clear indicator of breathtaking dysfunction.

      No–the Priests’ function is simply to 1) confuse you with an ink-cloud of custom-made jargonwhich they understand little more than you do, yet which somehow magically projects *auctoritas*. Then: 2) profit.

      There are a few genuine Wizards out there, I think, who actually understand how the Machine works, and do their part to keep it humming. But I do think their numbers are declining, especially with Woke hiring practices that maniacally sieve out any signs of real comprehension in the workforce.

      It’s a mixed blessing, if true. The Machine is our prison, but also our life-support. And while the Wizards are basically evil, we also forgot how to live without them after they are wholly replaced by impostors.

  4. shotho May 10, 2021 at 10:02 am #

    I agree with this post. The hyper-complexity of our vast bureaucratic system is the most damaging aspect of our society. Do you really trust any transaction today to be done correctly and efficiently? How much time do you spend having to correct a deal that should have been straightforward and simple? The only way to rationalize what we are dealing with now is to tear it down and start over. The tearing down will have to be done with implosion and the results should be impressive. It’s only a matter of time and, probably, not much of that.

  5. malthuss May 10, 2021 at 10:09 am #

    The Colonial Pipeline breakdown should send a kind of grim message.

    A few months ago there was a breakdown in food supply in the USA.
    I do not know the name of the distribution company. It supplied or moved the frozen food in USA.

    Anyone have a link?

  6. malthuss May 10, 2021 at 10:15 am #

    HECKLER
    These copy pastes are for you,

    Aphreikah Duhaney-West, CEO of Ochsner LSU Health Shreveport”
    At least we got a new nickname for Louisiana out of this story: Africa West.

    Just in the past few weeks in occupied New Orleans: A black street performer in a Chewbacca suit stabbed a rival in the French Quarter; seven teens of color (5 boys, 2 girls) carjacked & then crashed a pickup; an ambulance was ambulancejacked from a hospital; a white coffee shop franchisee in the French Quarter had his store ownership revoked for criticizing LeBron (“TheBrown”) James on Twitter;

    a white Alabama grandmother was fatally punched by a brotha in (guess where?) the French Quarter; [she spent her time caring for a mulatto grandchild], Nike moved its store from a crime-ridden section of Mid City to the leafy Elmwood suburb;
    Joe Biden wants to spend billions to remove a major section of I-10 that was built through (meaning over) a not-so-historic “historic Black neighborhood” just above the (yup) French Quarter.
    This list only scratches the surface of the never-ending crime wave in the Big Easy. (Melanated persons commit about 97% of NOLA’s annual homicides.) This website ought to open a New Orleans bureau just to cover it.
    And as SBPDL reported last week, nine black children were shot at a birthday party in nearby enriched city LaPlace, and none of the 60 adults snitched on the shooter.

    THIS. is there a week that goes by that a white person is not murdered by an african-american? there are 45 million black people in the u.s. and proportionately speaking, the murders represent a small percentage of them, yet, it all comes down to this very thing, the proportions.

    Whites are not killing anyone in this amount of numbers, especially blacks.
    we are being lied to constantly, repeatedly, day after day, by the irrational and insane method of reporting as represented by the so called establishment media reporters, none of whom can be any longer taken as being servants of the truth. propagandists yes, servants of the truth.

    …Any comments? Then theres the case of the White gal who biked cross USA for Obama [I forget what year, she campaigned for barry].
    She was killed in the Lower Ninth and her body lay on the sidewalk as blacks ignored it.
    The San Fran media did a bit of a cover up [she was from the bay area].

    • SW May 10, 2021 at 10:56 am #

      I’m glad I got to see New Orleans years ago while it still had charm, great restaurants and beautiful residential neighborhoods. And the people who lived there were happy to see tourists. Two LVNs I worked with were from the ninth ward and had to leave b/c of the damage by Katrina. What they described to me was an interconnected neighborhood with a lot of visiting, sharing food and extended family.

    • BackRowHeckler May 10, 2021 at 10:59 am #

      Malthus

      @ re: eliminating section of I-10 in New Orleans

      What a coincidence! Just about and hour ago the Mayor of Hartford and Senator Blumenthal held a news conference announcing efforts to abandon I-84 & I-91 thru the city (which they claim are racist) and replace them with a massive tunnel system underneath the Connecticut River. Estimated cost: $50 billion. Turns out interstates running thru Hartford wasn’t such a good idea after all. Problem is, previous costly projects that required massive amounts of concrete and money, Constitution Plaza in the 50s and the Civic Center in the 70s all turned out to be colossal failures, and are now largely abandoned. This latest megalomaniacal fantasy, we are assured, is solid, and will lead to a bright and prosperous future.

      Brh

      • tlauria May 10, 2021 at 11:04 am #

        Too bad Robert Moses wasn’t around today. He could condemn the Cross Bronx Expressway that connects the GW Bridge from NJ to the New England Thruway and replace it with a tunnel – across the entire width of the borough of The Bronx at the cost of only $1 trillion!

      • draupnir May 10, 2021 at 11:17 am #

        Don’t worry. They’ probably won’t even get it started before the end of such things is upon us. It’s probably not even intended. They simply need to sell bonds.

        • Blackbird May 10, 2021 at 11:37 am #

          I suspect you are correct. These “infrastructure projects” are largely going to be all talk, no tangible results – but a whole lot of spending. Whatever the Big Guy vomits, his disciples will eagerly lap up. After all they don’t live there, they won’t know nothing changed on the ground – and if you showed them the empty promises, they would still see a rainbow-colored wonderland. Tater Tot speaks reality into existence, his followers scurry into this fantasy world to watch the shadow show.

      • malthuss May 10, 2021 at 11:18 am #

        spent to what end. stadiums, malls, etc.

        I recently met a young man driving a fancy car. His job is developing malls. ‘not here, next one will be in Arizona.’

        I didnt tell him malls are mauled. due to amazon and USA financial collapse.

        • MrMangoOnMyShoulder May 10, 2021 at 12:21 pm #

          Haha, well he must be sitting precariously atop that niche foodchain for the moment…might as well be going into movie theaters or pagers.

          I’m picturing Michael Scott.

        • BackRowHeckler May 10, 2021 at 12:22 pm #

          Stadiums and malls exactly. All publicly funded, all failures.

      • SW May 10, 2021 at 11:29 am #

        @BRH — but of course they won’t use a fraction of that $50 billion to renovate the plaza and civic center and have them functioning public spaces.

      • Uncle Bob May 10, 2021 at 3:07 pm #

        So Connecticut didnt learn from Boston’s Big Dig? Or maybe they did, and just want some graft for themselves?

      • Tekapo May 10, 2021 at 6:24 pm #

        Turns out interstates running thru Hartford wasn’t such a good idea after all.

        It really depends on the city, and the planning, eh? Some cities work fairly seamlessly, with interstates running through them, both for intra-city commuters, and those just heading straight through, while in others it is a nightmare, and they have really messed with traffic flow, residential living and commercial activity.

        The spaghetti junctions in East Hartford look very “impressive” – that’s an awful lot of sunk investment (let alone concrete) that would have to be abandoned!

        Map view: https://goo.gl/maps/X2NkRA2AgLRMqNH87

    • Yohannon May 10, 2021 at 11:40 am #

      The late Tom Metzger (White Nationalist) said that it took eight White deaths to wake up one White person. And you know what? I have no idea if he was being ironic about that or if the precise number was part of the joke.

      • Blackbird May 10, 2021 at 12:23 pm #

        With a ratio like that, whites will be a minority smaller than transgendered Muslim Eskimos by the time we all wake up. Maybe we will be preserved as a curiosity in a fenced Potemkin Trailer Park somewhere in Kansas.

        • draupnir May 10, 2021 at 2:22 pm #

          At the rate our replacements are arriving from south of the border, I suspect most of us are on the schedule to be genocided.

          • Blackbird May 10, 2021 at 5:51 pm #

            I’m sure they’ll keep a few of us around – but only the blonde and female. And they will dispose of them once they are used up…

    • BackRowHeckler May 10, 2021 at 11:41 am #

      Wendy Magrinat, tourist from RI shot on Times Square, along with her 4 yo daughter, also shot

      “I was shot, nobody would help me. I thought I’d never see my daughter again.”

      PUT THAT ON YOUR GLOSSY PROMOTIONAL NYC TOURIST BROCHURE, Mayor Diblassio!

      Include on the brochure a pic of the distinguished assailant running up 42nd street.

    • Pete May 10, 2021 at 12:13 pm #

      The Civil Rights movement was highjacked in 1964 by democrats.

      Today, they are using black people to divide all people. Because systemic racism in America is a false premise, this effort will fail, and they will cause a backlash against the very people they pretend to care about.

      We need to socially distance ourselves from socialists.

      • Blackbird May 10, 2021 at 12:24 pm #

        An intended backlash.

      • Yohannon May 10, 2021 at 1:19 pm #

        Nah, the Blacks love being on top. And they are being given the right to attack Whites. Think they don’t love that too?

        You’re fantasizing about some imaginary period of racial harmony. They behaved better because they knew what happened if they didn’t. We were on top in other words.

        • Wizard of the Saddle May 11, 2021 at 3:11 pm #

          This is correct. No use pretending it was ever otherwise. Examples to the contrary are merely outliers and posers – nothing more. There is no tolerance, just a raw competition for supremacy and dominance.

    • redrock May 11, 2021 at 8:18 pm #

      Many of the carboniferous hard core unemployables cause problems for the decent members of that race, but they will not or cannot stop it.

  7. RaymondR May 10, 2021 at 10:16 am #

    The lesson from the Colonial Pipeline hack is simple and easily seen by America’s enemies, both foreign and domestic. Watch for more of these incidents as failed policies, both foreign and domestic, come home to roost.

    And so it begins

    Thanks JHK

    • Night Owl May 10, 2021 at 11:44 am #

      I would suggest that America’s and the West’s enemies (global capitalists) already planned this out to start up post-Covid Hoax.

      Just as Great Reset criminal Klaus Schwab said in a recent speech posted here. Now we are on the cyber attack phase and the empty store shelves and gas stations.

      • SW May 10, 2021 at 11:55 am #

        A headline from WSJ a few minutes ago “oil prices to surge after Colonial Pipeline Breakdown”.

        It’s hard to know what to believe is true, what’s fabricated on the spot as situations arise and what’s been planned and is going according to plan.

        Lumber prices have skyrocketed and are undermining independent builders’ profit margin — and that’s if they can even locate sufficient supplies.

      • O.G. Hawkins May 10, 2021 at 11:58 am #

        You are Right again, NO.

      • SvrzoH May 10, 2021 at 4:47 pm #

        “…(global capitalists) …”

        And, best of all, does not make you a commie by saying it.

      • MaryV May 12, 2021 at 7:59 pm #

        Food prices already soaring suddenly in the past 2 weeks.

        People in my neighborhood wondering why so many break-ins to cars are starting to happen (they never really did before).

        No one understands the big pic of what’s going on. Or very few.

    • bluedog May 10, 2021 at 12:34 pm #

      Most are created simply to move up the profit, we own a framing company and the cost has gone through the roof for materials, went to every stores that sell building material to buy nails to get enough to even put some tin on, the answer was always the same “can’t get them” the cost of lumber to frame a 2,000 sq. foot house has increased $25,000 that is if you can get it while lumber mills have shut down, the whole thing s a scam to push the prices up and increase the profit.

  8. tlauria May 10, 2021 at 10:29 am #

    Wondering how much one of the Bidens got for the sale of the password to the CCP to shut down Colonial.

    • JohnAZ May 10, 2021 at 10:43 am #

      A report on Fox last night reported the hack came from Eastern Europe.

      It maybe for money alone.

      The intimidation it does to this feckless government though is palpable, the world is seeing us now as the hollow shell we really are.

      Just think, about the time the USA loses its integrity, it will be well prepared for the Brown takeover, ie no one will even notice.

      • O.G. Hawkins May 10, 2021 at 12:09 pm #

        JAZ, Fox & MSNBC are like Coke & Pepsi. While differing slightly in flavour, they both serve sugary bull shit to the populace. One makes ya fat. The other makes you stupid.

        Turn off your TV.

        I gotta admit, I PVR pro sports to watch pro atletes compete.

        But Fox, MSNBC et al are no more than propaganda arms of The Beast. Fox will tell you what The Beast wants you to think. MSNBC will do the same for RL. You’ll both think that you’re smarter than those darn dunderheads watching the Wrong network.

        Online Research, while still available, is your only Hope at gleaning Truth.

        • Paul May 10, 2021 at 1:02 pm #

          “Turn off your TV” indeed. But also turn off your social media, and participation on online fora like this one, (with all due respect to JHK). “Wake up from your electronic hallucination”, as CHRIS HEDGES has written.
          It is time for North America to stop partying like it’s 1945 and to turn instead to more serious pursuits, such as picking stones and planting potatoes.

          • Blackbird May 10, 2021 at 1:18 pm #

            Yup. Get out of the Tower before it falls. Run far enough away that it doesn’t land on you. And, don’t look back!

          • O.G. Hawkins May 10, 2021 at 4:40 pm #

            Lot’s wife looked back at the destruction of Sodom & Gamorah and was turned to a pillar of salt.

          • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 5:18 pm #

            I’m doing both. On social media for the support of like-minded people which I don’t yet know in my new community, and growing a garden (a fairly large one).

        • Not_GeorgeT May 10, 2021 at 1:23 pm #

          Fox, MSNBC,(et al) is it really news (or just a scheme to sell advertising to targeted audiences by playing to the demographic groups?

          This isn’t exactly the link I was looking for, but close enough.

          https://taibbi.substack.com/p/how-reading-the-news-is-like-smoking

          He went to Substack as an escape to freedom. Agree sometimes, disagree at others, but consider he’s making a serious go at journalism.

          • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 5:20 pm #

            He is, indeed. I truly respect him for moving to substack where he won’t be censored (yet).

            Reading the mainstream news is like smoking.

            So is watching TV.

            So is hanging out on social media.

            I don’t have the 3d one licked yet but eventually I am assuming that decision will be made for me. Twitter’s already given me the heave-ho.

  9. SW May 10, 2021 at 10:42 am #

    Good article — it’s a preview of things to come, like it or not.

    And inflation is right around the corner too. Anyone who shops for food has seen the prices rise steadily and as gas prices go up, those will too. I was in a discount store the other day and saw a wicker rocker I bought 2 years ago for $60 now for $160 — exact same one. But we can live without those things but not necessities of course.

    When is the stock market going to nose-dive?

    • JohnAZ May 10, 2021 at 10:55 am #

      The stock market will not tank. It will follow the increased money supply, as it is a measure of the profits of the corporations. Many people became wealthy during the 70s inflation.

      The prices increasing does not mean much if the prices track the money being supplied, ie. Prices equal raises. The problem is fixed income folks, especially retirees. Hyper inflation can cause a significant portion of the population to stop spending, from which Depressions occur. COLA payments help here.

      Balance is required to stop surges in inflation from happening. That is the job of the Fed and interest rates. Interest rates are near zero and inconsequential, the Fed disappears. A little more money starving and deflation takes over. We live in dangerous times.

      Any body consider that this is all planned by our globalist PTB and that Biden is just a patsy to take us down, in all ways possible?

      • SW May 10, 2021 at 11:25 am #

        But how can value of stocks keep rising when there’s no asset behind them? Taibbi wrote an article about a deli that valued at more than $1 million that only sold (if I remember correctly) $36,000 annually in sales. Surely this can’t go on forever.

        Biden the Man Holding the Bag is the perfect patsy. He’s been a compliant player for 50+years and can’t last much longer so he can take the fall while others are shielded.

        • JohnAZ May 10, 2021 at 11:40 am #

          Corporations provide goods and services that are necessities for people. The capital base that provides this is intact and will remain. The Profit base remains the same. The market may level off or decline sharply but as long as people need things, markets will exist. The market operated during the Depression and made some, not as many rich.

          The biggest problem during the Depression was technical. Progress in manufacturing technology allowed the country to supply itself with 25% fewer people. How to fix that? Make expendable! Bullets, tanks, planes. Then find a place to blow them all up so next month we need more. Them knock off a big portion of the folks who are not working.

          Voila, problem solved. Sounds horrific, but at those levels, it is the way people in charge think.

          • O.G. Hawkins May 10, 2021 at 12:16 pm #

            Thus The Covids.

          • draupnir May 10, 2021 at 2:40 pm #

            Hawkins, the COVID is a major disappointment, at least as far as virulence is concerned. Perhaps the vaccinations with be more effective

          • O.G. Hawkins May 10, 2021 at 4:35 pm #

            BINGO!

        • Blackbird May 10, 2021 at 11:42 am #

          Stocks keep rising because that is where all the money we have been printing for the last 12 years goes. The asset backing those stocks is the Federal Government – wicker rockers would be more secure.

          • JohnAZ May 10, 2021 at 11:49 am #

            Yup

          • O.G. Hawkins May 10, 2021 at 12:27 pm #

            Exactly, BB. The Capstone will continue to attract the Stupid Money (i.e. the financial holdings of 99.99% of the people including pension and other retirement plans). They will then slowly bleed off their profits selling into the Stupid Money. I suspect that they may have already started. Why, they even control most of the Stupid Money and will not blink to do the equivalent of paying $2.5mm for that deli if it is –your retirement buying it and their deli for sale.

            Once the Rothschild’s like their positions, JAZ is Wrong:

            There will be a stock market crash.

            They know what they’re doing.

          • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 5:14 pm #

            Didn’t the stock market crash last year, just before Covid19?

            Why is everyone ignoring that?

      • O.G. Hawkins May 10, 2021 at 12:12 pm #

        The stock market will not tank.
        – JAZ, May 10, 2021

    • draupnir May 10, 2021 at 11:23 am #

      On May first, I purchased an item for $10.00, It was exactly what I wanted and I planned to by a few more, but when I went to buy it, the price had risen to $16.99, more than half again as much. Luckily, I found the item at another site for under $10.00 and ordered from them.

      • JohnAZ May 10, 2021 at 11:51 am #

        The pipeline is full of $10 units. When that runs dry, it will cost 16.99.

        If you need them buy them now.

        • draupnir May 10, 2021 at 1:58 pm #

          I’ve been stocking up on items I would find it inconvenient to do without for some time now.

    • Anthea May 10, 2021 at 4:00 pm #

      Many things that I purchased from the Dollar Store ten or fifteen years ago look like high-quality items, and of course are no longer available there. The folding bookcase I sent my daughter off to college with was $15 at the time. Last time I looked online they were about $75. When I take the glass candle-holder that I paid a dollar for to outdoor craft events (as a paperweight), people swoon over it and ask me where I got it.

      Things you thought were makeshift items for poor people now look like quality stuff.

    • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 5:16 pm #

      Hellooooooo….

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2020_stock_market_crash

  10. Lars May 10, 2021 at 10:45 am #

    The pipeline hack is a puzzle. Ordinarily, one would think that an attack on part of America’s critical infrastructure would mean it’s black helicopter time, but our response seems almost tepid. Maybe there’s a note: “This is a test; this is only a test; had it been an actual attack, we would have brought down your electrical grid or your financial system – or both.”

    As JHK documents, we are a paper tiger so I guess it is just a little pulling of the eagle’s tailfeathers. Our competitors can safely work through their proxies: the North Koreans for the Chinese and the freelance East European hacker syndicates for the Russians.

    • JohnAZ May 10, 2021 at 3:34 pm #

      The Germans sank the Lusitania, we clobbered them in WW1.

      The Japanese did Pearl Harbor, we do WW2.

      The Spanish sank the Maine, ???, we did the Spanish American War.

      Face it , we are cowards now unable to defend ourselves.

      • draupnir May 10, 2021 at 6:49 pm #

        Orlov said our military reminded him of the former Soviet Union’s military before the fall. The term he used was ‘flaccid.’ With our military now full of girly-men are they fit for war? My guess is they enlisted to get reassignment surgery, and are probably not otherwise invested. After all, someone might break a nail! Where are they going to plug in their curling irons? Are their estrogen pills going to arrive on time? What abut sanitary supplies? Some of them have bought used uteruses and ovaries and are planning on having periods–maybe babies. How are they going to run in size 10 high heels. How are they going to face Russian troops? Is the plan to whine at those men until they give up all will to live and fall to the ground curled in the fetal position? The Russians look like they’ve still got testosterone, the hairy brutes.

        • MiddlePeninsula May 11, 2021 at 8:42 am #

          I always remember the WWII casuaties in Russia were 20 million. That population absorbed a lot of hardship. I see no reason to think anything has changed. If I were Mr. Potato Head Biden, I would refrain from poking the bear.

  11. BackRowHeckler May 10, 2021 at 10:45 am #

    Well, the biggest shutter downer of fuel pipelines in the US is Gina McCarthy, Joe Biden, and the Climate Czar, John Kerry.

    Jim, as far as our electric grid goes, plans are in the works to scrap it right now, and replace it with a new, even more hyper complex system of giant windmills coast to coast, storage batteries, and transformers to convert AC power to DC power, and back to AC power.

    Baseload nuclear, natgas and coal fired generating plants are being decommissioned across the country, especially in NY and California. Biden states the process of ‘Decarbonization’ will be completed by 2030, a short 8 1/2 years from now.
    By then a whole new Clean Grid will have been installed, freeing us from our “fossil fuel addiction.” We’re kicking the habit. And oh yes, we’ll all be happily driving EVs by then, too.

    Brh

    • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 10:54 am #

      I’ll be happily riding a bike! Back to basics as the complexities of things gets more and more insane.

      The steps one has to go through to do anything now is crazy. Liabilities, insurance, legalese, etc.

      Who needs it? I think I will start the Simplicity movement. Something like the Luddite movement.

      Back to basics.

      • Ron Anselmo May 10, 2021 at 12:23 pm #

        Amish.

        • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 2:34 pm #

          Without the religion part I guess, yes.

          • Ron Anselmo May 10, 2021 at 3:34 pm #

            Yes, and of course, your own dress code. You needn’t dress like the Amish girls. Unless you like that look, of course.

          • Anthea May 10, 2021 at 4:07 pm #

            Mmm…. I’d say that the undermining of every standard, whether moral and religious, or academic, or social is the greatest danger of all.

            You are either a being of immeasurable dignity and glory (and this is the inwardness of religion), or you are a commodity.

          • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 5:12 pm #

            Anthea, that sure is a lot of assumption and black and white thinking.

          • Ron Anselmo May 10, 2021 at 10:48 pm #

            Lighten up Francis:))

      • redrock May 11, 2021 at 10:21 pm #

        Doc said he would write a scrip. Told him to keep it. To much chemical warfare. To complicated everywhere.

      • Ishabaka May 13, 2021 at 9:53 am #

        I went to a bike shop a week ago. I could get the model I wanted, the waiting time was only 15 months.

    • JohnAZ May 10, 2021 at 11:04 am #

      BRH

      Hey, how many new wind farms or solar fields are on the books. Nuclear wise NY just shut down their last Nuke plant.

      What the heck is going on here? We think that shutting down pipelines and FF generators will just miraculously, poof, create all this infrastructure? Never!!

      So what is our illiterate Dem government doing about a coming disaster?

      Nothing, because it does not have a clue what to do. TDS is removing FF day to day.

      Oh yeah, we are very concerned on the number one issue of our country,

      Whether people should wear masks after they are vaccinated.

      Lord, no wonder China and Russia just laugh us off now.

      • JohnAZ May 10, 2021 at 11:07 am #

        I look at the doddering old fool play acting as our president and realize he is just a reflection of the USA populace now. When will people realize how badly we are being played?

        As a result of the Stupidification program, probably never.

        • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 11:12 am #

          I’m sort of obsessed with that crazy pic of the Giant Bidens with the pygmy Carters.

          Why did they do that? It’s obviously horribly photoshopped. They had to know that. So what in the hell is the purpose for releasing it? Is it to prove they can tell us not to believe our lying eyes? Is it to mock the office of the presidency?

          It’s rather insane.

          And at a time where Biden is covid-obsessed, none of them are wearing masks in close quarters, to boot.

          • BackRowHeckler May 10, 2021 at 11:47 am #

            Mary that was a creepy picture. Was it legit, or photoshopped as you say. And if photoshopped, to what end?

          • JohnAZ May 10, 2021 at 11:53 am #

            The Carter’s looked like Hobbits.

          • Blackbird May 10, 2021 at 11:54 am #

            Why would the Carters, if they have any decency, even pose for such a ridiculous “portrait”? The Carters look tiny and frail, as if they were carefully removed from their storage cabinets and posed by the mighty Bidens. Close quarters, no masks, all ancient…

            I think the terrible Photoshop work (over the past several years) is meant to rub our noses in it. More divide and conquer. One-third of the country laughs at poor Photoshop work, one-third gushes, “Oh, aren’t the Bidens wonderful!!”, and one-third is on X-box.

          • Slugoon May 10, 2021 at 12:04 pm #

            It looks to have been taken with quite a wide-angle lens, which exaggerates the foreground compared to the background. Look at Jimmy’s shoes, they’re the most exaggerated object of all, being closest to the camera. Little Ros is sitting the farthest away.

          • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 2:52 pm #

            It was photoshopped. They tried to walk it back by saying it was a wide-angle lens. That’s a lie.

            1. I’m a photographer. You would never ever ever choose a wide angle lens to take a portrait in a small room (or any room really).

            2. If it were wide angle, then the part of the Bidens closest to the Carters would gradually slope down to their size. But it’s not gradual. There is just BIG BIDEN and little Carters.

            SO they put the pic out then lied about why it’s obviously photoshopped. I noticed it in 1 second.

            So, the question remains, why?

          • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 2:54 pm #

            @Slugoon, I explained why there is no way it’s a wide-angle lens and why no photographer in their right mind would use one to do a portrait. It just isn’t done because it distorts people.

            They aren’t distorted, they’re just big and little.

          • KappaJoe May 10, 2021 at 3:04 pm #

            Is that photo even legit? Was it presented as legit by the MSM? If so, they are being severely trolled.

            Also, I came across an update where someone further photoshopped the entire Munchkin cast from “The Wizard of Oz” next to, behind, and between the Carters with a portrait of Glinda, the Good Witch of the North, on the wall!

            I think someone is sending a not too subtle message there: the maskless Bidens are much bigger than the Carters – bigger failures, bigger scammers, bigger frauds, bigger criminals, or maybe just bigger Munchkins.

          • Slugoon May 10, 2021 at 3:09 pm #

            I also have a couple of wide angle lenses. The best reason to use them is not to ‘fit everything in’ but to exaggerate distance and the foreground/background relationship for effect.

            I wouldn’t choose to use one for portraiture either but if that tight room is all you’ve got then it’s that or no photo. The photographer could have arranged them in a better way to minimise it.

            Look at the convergence of verticals at the edges and picture frames. It’s a wide-angle lens.

          • Slugoon May 10, 2021 at 3:14 pm #

            Also, look at the difference in height between the left side of Carter’s chair to the right side, which is closer to the camera and therefore much taller, as you’d expect with a wide angle lens.

          • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 4:37 pm #

            No.

            If it were a wide angle lens (again no pro would use one for that) then the distortion would be gradual. It isn’t. There are simply big bidens and little carters. There is no gradual changing in size which is what wide angle lenses do.

            It’s clear as day, but you know how people now don’t trust their own lyin’ eyes if the media tells you not to.

          • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 4:39 pm #

            @KappaJoe yes it’s legit.

            Then after they put it out, people started asking questions, so the ‘wide angle lens’ story came out.

            Saw many other photogs including me debunk that straight out.

            Slugoon still believes (as he does in the official story of 9/11). So I am guessing he trusts the White House and press, whereas I always question them.

          • Slugoon May 10, 2021 at 4:50 pm #

            Again, if you can’t back up then you’ve got no choice, it’s that or no photo. I guess you see what you want to see but it’s not ‘clear as day’ at all. I’ve pointed out several characteristics of wide angle lenses that are visible in this photo.

            But yeah, Biden’s official photographer is just out to punk you.

          • Slugoon May 10, 2021 at 5:08 pm #

            For clarification, I wouldn’t automatically trust anything that comes out of Biden’s or Psaki’s mouth. I’d have voted for Donnie were I an American citizen and I’ve got no doubt that your government is neck-deep in shady business but sometimes the evidence just doesn’t stack up. Not everything is a conspiracy against you.

            I’ve just had Night Owl telling me how impossible it was for a Saudi to fly a commercial jet and turn it in a circle. The guy had a commercial pilot’s licence with an instrument rating, Boeing simulator time, and the bird was turned in a circle within the normal operating envelope of any commercial airplane. The Towers were easy targets. No amount of evidence seems to get through. It’s very thick tin foil.

          • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 5:31 pm #

            Slugoon, anyone could have taken a better photo than that with their cell phone.

            You continue to drink the kool-aide, I can’t help you.

          • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 5:34 pm #

            The only time you would use a wide angle lens for a group of people is if you were outside or in a LARGE space. It makes zero sense in a small indoor space. And again, this wasn’t that.

          • Night Owl May 10, 2021 at 5:38 pm #

            Slug, post your evidence.

            And it wasn’t a circle. it was a near 180 turn of a jetliner. The pilots who could not complete it in the simulator are the ones who said it is impossible.

            Did you even go to the site?

            Or were they just too shitty?

            LOL.

          • Night Owl May 10, 2021 at 5:40 pm #

            Looks like Slug is going full McMedia on us.

            “It looks to have been taken with quite a wide-angle lens,”

            This is literally the media line being printed far and wide.

            By all means, share your hard evidence.

          • Slugoon May 10, 2021 at 5:44 pm #

            It would make sense if it was the only focal length you could use given the space available.

            I think it’s a decent photo. The white balance is good, looks like some off-camera flash has been used, poor choice of lens for sure but may have been the only option without turfing the Carters out of their chairs into another room, and I don’t think the keystone verticals are too distracting.

            Most camera phones are 28mm equivalent. That’s wide angle. They distort faces too but they’re good for scenery.

          • Night Owl May 10, 2021 at 5:47 pm #

            White balance is good, kids.

            Nothing to see here.

            Jesus wept.

          • Slugoon May 10, 2021 at 5:49 pm #

            Here’s the radar plot from the NTSB. I don’t see any fighter jet manoeuvres here. If you do please point them out.
            https://nsarchive2.gwu.edu/NSAEBB/NSAEBB196/doc02.pdf

          • Night Owl May 10, 2021 at 6:03 pm #

            So what is this disproving?

            I see a difficult maneuver to execute at speed in a commercial airliner. And I watched a group of pro pilots at Pilots for Truth fail to complete the maneuver and call it impossible.

            And let us examine your claim that Hanjour was a pro pilot with good skills:

            “Mr. Hanjour, who investigators contend piloted the airliner that crashed into the Pentagon, was reported to the aviation agency in February 2001 after instructors at his flight school in Phoenix had found his piloting skills so shoddy and his grasp of English so inadequate that they questioned whether his pilot’s license was genuine.

            Records show a Hani Hanjour obtained a license in 1999 in Scottsdale, Ariz. Previous and sometimes contradictory reports said he failed in 1996 and 1997 to obtain a license at other schools.”

            https://www.nytimes.com/2002/05/04/us/a-trainee-noted-for-incompetence.html

            I even went McMedia for you. This report seems a departure from your claim.

            BTW, if you have any video evidence of what hit the Pentagon that was not shot from a potatocam, I would also be most interested to view it.

            I am openminded, you see.

          • Night Owl May 10, 2021 at 6:11 pm #

            “Staff members characterized Mr. Hanjour as polite, meek and very quiet. But most of all, the former employee said, they considered him a very bad pilot.

            ”I’m still to this day amazed that he could have flown into the Pentagon,” the former employee said. ”He could not fly at all.”

            https://www.nytimes.com/2002/05/04/us/a-trainee-noted-for-incompetence.html

            Hahahahaha.

          • Slugoon May 10, 2021 at 6:17 pm #

            First of all it disproves your claim of a 180° turn. It was a 330° turn.

            Secondly you claim it was a ‘difficult’ manoeuvre based on… what exactly? Your incredulity? The plot shows a circle of some 5nm in diameter. Go look up the formula for the turn radius of an aircraft. It’s a function of speed and bank angle. Plug some numbers in.

            Thirdly, I didn’t say he was a professional pilot nor that he had good skills. I said he had a commercial pilot’s licence with an instrument rating and simulator experience. There are many ways to be an incompetent pilot. There are lots of them out there right now. Take PIA8303 for example. But just about the easiest thing you could do in an aeroplane is turn and point it somewhere. You don’t need good skills to do that. I’ll agree with you that his landing was bad.

          • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 6:50 pm #

            Oooh Sluggoon’s doubling down and now calling the Giant Bidens and Pygmy Carter pic (which is now a laughingstock) a ‘good photo’.

            But nice white balance. Hahahahaha!

            White balance and the fact you like it is not a very good argument against it being photoshopped.

          • Slugoon May 10, 2021 at 7:00 pm #

            I don’t like the photo because I can’t stand looking at your joke of a President but apart from the choice of lens I think it’s technically sound and better than one could get on a phone, which is what you argued.

            I bet they were thinking of you when applying the mask brush in Photoshop. How dastardly of them!

          • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 7:47 pm #

            @Blackbird, we are of like mind there. Rubbing our noses in it.

            Joe Joe’s hand moves right through a microphone and if we notice it we’re conspiracy theorists.

            This is why they do it.

          • Slugoon May 11, 2021 at 1:02 am #

            Mary, that’s straw. I agree with you on that one. We were talking about this photo, not that video.

          • Night Owl May 11, 2021 at 3:34 am #

            1. No the claim is from PFT. Actual professional pilots. The actual paraphrased quote was (excuse my earlier memory from 2001): “It required making a tight 320-degree turn while descending seven thousand feet, then leveling out so as to fly low enough over the highway just west of the Pentagon to knock down lamp posts. After crossing the highway the pilot had to take the plane to within inches of the ground so as to crash into the Pentagon at the first-floor level and at such a shallow angle that an engine penetrated three rings of the building, while managing to avoid touching the lawn”

            2. You claimed he had a professional pilot’s license and used this to bolster the claim that he successfully completed an extremely difficult maneuver (that according to pro pilots is seemingly impossible in an commercial airliner) and that he controlled said airliner in a manner sufficient to fly it into a low wall at the most heavily guarded building in the country.

            3. Provide us footage of what hit the Pentagon not shot from a potato cam. Or is there none available? Odd that.

          • Night Owl May 11, 2021 at 3:52 am #

            Mary, one of my old jobs required me to learn photography with a pro, and to serve as his assistant when doing editorial coverage of some big conferences at an organization I used to work at in DC.

            The proportions are completely out of whack in that photo. I don’t understand why the photo was edited, other than to reinforce this idea that the Bidens are competent, but the whole thing is certainly bizarre. I am sure there are some deep state psychologists who have it all mapped out.

            LOL.

          • Slugoon May 11, 2021 at 5:06 am #

            Apologies to all CFNers for all the excessive scrolling to get past this tin foil but I’m keen to engage Owl on 9/11 and learn more about what drives him and other pilots to belief the ‘impossibility’ of AA77 and maybe I can learn something about my own profession in the process.

            1. No the claim is from PFT. Actual professional pilots. The actual paraphrased quote was (excuse my earlier memory from 2001): “It required making a tight 320-degree turn while descending seven thousand feet, then leveling out so as to fly low enough over the highway just west of the Pentagon to knock down lamp posts. After crossing the highway the pilot had to take the plane to within inches of the ground so as to crash into the Pentagon at the first-floor level and at such a shallow angle that an engine penetrated three rings of the building, while managing to avoid touching the lawn”

            2. You claimed he had a professional pilot’s license and used this to bolster the claim that he successfully completed an extremely difficult maneuver (that according to pro pilots is seemingly impossible in an commercial airliner) and that he controlled said airliner in a manner sufficient to fly it into a low wall at the most heavily guarded building in the country.

            Owl, please read my words carefully and do not misinterpret them to mean what you want them to mean. He did not have a professional pilot’s licence, he had a commercial pilot’s licence. He was not a professional pilot, he did not earn money from flying aeroplanes. He was issued with a commercial pilot’s licence and therefore was signed off by an FAA examiner as having met a particular standard.

            I do not claim he was a good pilot in any sense. There are some shocking commercial pilots out there. Almost every major hull loss in recent times has been down to pilots not doing basic pilot stuff. This was not an Immelmann turn or a Cuban Eight, it was a basic descending turn. How can you believe that someone with a commercial pilot’s licence, no matter how bad the guy might have been through his training, could not make such a basic turn?

            The ‘impossible turn’ that you claimed was 180º was a mundane turn of 330º so I’m already wondering what else you and your sources are wrong about. I previously linked you to the NTSB radar ground plot. It shows an orbit of around 5nm diameter. An aircraft at 300kts (fast) can turn a circle of 4.6nm using 30º angle of bank in still air. Your concept of ‘extremely difficult’ must be different to mine.

            Fying level at low altitude in good, daylight VMC is not difficult either, particularly if your intention is to hit something. If you go to any airport you will notice that any lampposts on the approach path are shortened. I’m guessing the Arlington County urban planners didn’t think to put those around the Pentagon for some reason. Is it so hard to believe a few got hit near the target? The approach slope for normal aircraft is 3º – remarkably shallow when you visualise it. Plenty of aircraft who have come in too low on their approach have clipped localiser aerials in the undershoot.

            I’ve searched for the Pilots for Truth website and pilotsfor911truth.org does not seem to exist any longer. All I can find is one ‘press release’ that makes some pretty ambiguous and unsupported claims about knocking down lampposts and altitude discrepancies. Perhaps you could link me to their official analysis and sources of data so I can learn how the physics of AA77 is different to that of my aeroplane.

          • Night Owl May 11, 2021 at 5:50 am #

            Now Hani was not a “good pilot,” but you are certain he accomplished a near-impossible maneuver. How the goalposts shift after the NYT article.

            LOL.

            It appears Pilots for Truth has been suspended. Link still available on Yandex, but site suspended.

            Here is a video where the experiment is discussed.
            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GEQtxTnDusk

            And here is a much more detailed vid. for which YouTube wants credit card verification of your age in order to watch (all normal, right Slugo?).

            When you are finished, do post non-potatocam footage of the “plane.” Do educate us Foilers.

          • Night Owl May 11, 2021 at 5:52 am #

            Link to second vid. You need to log in to Youtube for age verification, and then provide your credit card number to watch.

            I trust this is acceptable for someone with an honest interest in the subject matter.

            I look forward to your detailed thoughts.

            https://yandex.com/video/preview/?text=pilots%20for%20truth&path=wizard&parent-reqid=1620725989188562-1650753919555101140500243-production-app-host-man-web-yp-215&wiz_type=v4thumbs&filmId=5199850427254899064

          • Slugoon May 11, 2021 at 6:16 am #

            I never claimed he was a good pilot, he probably wasn’t judging by the comments of people that knew him, but he was more than capable of making a simple turn. It was not a near-impossible turn, how many times does that need spelling out? I’ve linked you to the radar plot and demonstrated how an aeroplane could easily turn in that airspace.

            That video is hilarious. Are you serious? This is your evidence? Wow. Nothing but straw man arguments and arguments from incredulity. They sound like weekend armchair flight simmers, talking about Dutch roll, which is a high altitude phenomenon. Talking about needing to turn the jet so tight it would break up due to structural failure. The instructors at our outfit, indeed any professional pilot, would laugh this guy and that video right out of town.

            I think you need to get in a flight simulator and educate yourself. When I was in one two nights ago we didn’t practise descending turns. That’s something you learn in Lesson 9 of basic flight training.

          • Night Owl May 11, 2021 at 7:10 am #

            No offense, but I am not interested in hearing a rehash of agitprop tinfoil.

            The claim that Hajour took out the Pentagon remains specious at best, and this discussion has done nothing to bolster that level of nutcrockery.

            I remain open to the idea that it perhaps, somehow, could have happened, but I have yet to see any convincing evidence and his own flight instructors said he could not fly.

            I realize you may be a hobby pilot and that your learnings there may make you feel qualified to determine fact from fiction, but I will continue to file this in the drawer of unsubstantiated agit prop.

            In the legal realm, the claim must be substantiated by the claimant, and to date the claimaints encoutered never seem to be able to provide any hard evidence, yet the circumstantial evidence is overwhelming that the claim is not just highly unlikely to have occured, but that it is the stuff BlueAnon.

            See ya around.

          • Slugoon May 11, 2021 at 7:34 am #

            We can leave it to others to judge who is wearing the industrial grade foil. I have countered all of your whack-job theories of impossible turns with verifiable evidence. I had high hopes for your ‘professional pilots’ giving me something to go on, and then you produced that video.

            People who can’t conduct a simple turn don’t get issued with commercial licenses by the FAA. I sort of know what I’m talking about as I work for a major UK airline but I suppose it is a hobby of sorts. Easy money, especially when you have to make it go left or right.

            Fly away, little Owl.

          • Night Owl May 11, 2021 at 7:52 am #

            I don’t have a theory. I simply provided circumstantial evidence to the industrial grade foil that you provided.

            Your hard (flaccid?) evidence that Hanjour carried out the attack was that you looked at a flight log and that you claim you are an amateur pilot.

            Wings of tinfoil.

            Do you have that video, BTW? No?

            LOL.

          • zizzybalooba May 12, 2021 at 11:28 am #

            Slugoon, you’re wasting your time arguing facts with tin foil hats. There is an unemployed commenter on these pages who claims to be a neuro doctor with expertise on epidemiology and Covid-19 vaccines. Ok, we believe you and now take your meds.

    • Yohannon May 10, 2021 at 11:42 am #

      Kicking the “life habit” more likely.

      • Not_GeorgeT May 10, 2021 at 9:48 pm #

        Dog comm, hussein’s mutt boxed, follow-on = peanut farmer pic. No certainty; open for public speculation; see what transpires; assessment might be both plentiful and bountiful after the fact. Who didn’t receive a note at the state spectacle for 41?

    • Blackbird May 10, 2021 at 11:45 am #

      Uh huh. Why does it have to be “somebody else” who shut Colonial down. Seems most if not all of the big events in this country are caused by our government, but blamed on someone else.

      • JohnAZ May 10, 2021 at 11:56 am #

        Because it is too regular and organized to be little people making it happen

      • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 7:47 pm #

        Our Deep State likes to self-sabotage ,or haven’t you noticed that, JAZ?

      • Not_GeorgeT May 10, 2021 at 9:31 pm #

        Do Ya think?

    • abbybwood May 10, 2021 at 2:44 pm #

      And we’ll kill all our birds in the process.

      I wouldn’t be surprised if the idiots deliberately place the turbines in the middle of migratory pathways.

      Even Trump once said about the wind turbines: “But think about all those millions of dead little birdies.”

      • JohnAZ May 10, 2021 at 3:37 pm #

        Maybe the birds use high wind pathways as an express lane.

        Just where we will put windmills.

        • Blackbird May 10, 2021 at 4:47 pm #

          Bingo. Sauce for the goose is sauce for the, ummm, windmill…

          • Slugoon May 10, 2021 at 5:17 pm #

            That’s Alba’s phrase! (Not the windmill bit.)

          • Blackbird May 10, 2021 at 5:30 pm #

            I had to tweak it a bit to get around the copyright protection.

          • GreenAlba May 12, 2021 at 8:31 am #

            The proverb is old and in the public domain. Rather like me. 🙂

          • Slugoon May 12, 2021 at 9:27 am #

            I hear the phrase “what’s good for the goose…” used, albeit rarely, but because you invoke the word “sauce” I hereby bestow ownership upon you.

          • GreenAlba May 13, 2021 at 6:28 am #

            If only I were a proper narcissist, Slugoon, I would be able to sit back and take the credit. 🙂

            But I cannot.

            https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/what%27s_sauce_for_the_goose_is_sauce_for_the_gander#:~:text=Etymology,the%20bull%E2%80%9D%20(1549).

            Seems it has roots way back in the 16th century, thankfully unlike me.

        • Night Owl May 11, 2021 at 8:03 am #

          Adolf Hitler also wanted to put windmills in windy areas where birds flew.

          How dare U.

  12. MaryV May 10, 2021 at 10:51 am #

    Needless invented complexities, planned obsolescence, a power grid held together with string and band-aids, what could go wrong?

    They told us the tech age would simplify things and make them easier. Not at all. Just on the office-level, I have never seen so many different software applications necessary to do ones’ job. I worked in IT for 15 years and now do project management and even for this techie it’s gotten laugh-out-loud crazy. I probably work with around 20+ apps. Back in the 1980s, it was 1-2. And somehow we got everything done.

    If all of the software spoke to each other it would be one thing; but they all only relate to other specific ones. So it has grown into quite the quagmire. Along the way, actual GREAT software was acquired and destroyed or just destroyed (Word Perfect and Macromedia Flash for example).

    We are left with only cloud-based junk. And what happens when the cloud goes down and we lose our life’s work? Oh well. Sorry!

    I just bought an 8 tetrabyte drive and I am moving everything from dropbox to it. Because we can’t trust these silicon valley billionaires even a little bit.

    • JohnAZ May 10, 2021 at 11:15 am #

      MaryV

      It is the key to profitability in the tech industry.

      Just like cars, the reliability of solid state control removes planned obsolescence. So replacement of generations of cars, or computers on a regular basis is not required.

      Right?

      Unless the manufacturer makes design changes to the software of both that makes former units too slow or non responsive. Welcome to Microsoft and Bill Gates who created this quagmire.

      Same thing happens to big computer users, like the gubment or pipeline controllers. Spend spend spend every so many years or your security becomes non-existent.

      For every new creation by Man, evil and good both happen. Evil is rapidly taking over hi tech.

    • Yohannon May 10, 2021 at 11:56 am #

      They probably have a Plan for that, but I doubt we will like it very much. Something like:

      One Ring to rule them all,
      One Ring to find them.
      One Ring to bring them all,
      And in the darkness bind them.

  13. messianicdruid May 10, 2021 at 10:53 am #

    My wife has to change from home peritoneal dialisis to hemo dialisis which involves a catheter. Well the one they put in last Wednesday quit working so we are back at the hospital having it replaced.

    They want us to do home hemo but after this fiasco I fully recognize this is above my pay grade.

    Now they come in and want to do another covid swab up her nose because they can’t find a fooking record from last wednesday!

    • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 11:10 am #

      This is why I question the Great Reset.

      Our future is tech-controlled? Where are they going to get all the requisite raw materials to make this happen? They can’t even keep our internet connections from dropping.

      This seems like a deal-breaker, and yet it continues apace.

      • JohnAZ May 10, 2021 at 11:26 am #

        The Great Reset is that the common average Jill or Joe no longer are in control of their destiny because they do not really understand what controls their lives.

        Look at the previous post where people are being affected by medical changes they do not understand. The skyrocketing cost of insulin is being caused by progressive elegance.

        Think about how few people actually control your life right now. The PTB have us right where they want us.

        Ever consider that FF is a business where brawn and smarts still count to a large degree. Can’t have that in a society of sheep.

        The Great Reset is already here, it started Jan 20, no really Nov. 3.

        Join the troops celebrating the GR, get on welfare, become a gimme.

        Become mediocre, just like your Deep State.

        BTW, has Congress done anything at all?

        • O.G. Hawkins May 10, 2021 at 1:07 pm #

          You are correct, JAZ.

          Now. Take another 2 steps back and look:

          The 330mm Americans are approximately 4.4% of Earth’s population and what is happening is Global.

          • JohnAZ May 10, 2021 at 3:40 pm #

            And those Americans used to be the leader of the innovative world.

            Used to be? Look around, China is replacing us.

          • O.G. Hawkins May 10, 2021 at 4:33 pm #

            The Capstone does not give a shit about nations, JAZ. The World is their oyster and almost all 7.5B are “useless eaters.”

            “USA! USA!”

            That means something to you but it is merely another way to exploit you for them. You are correct, the USA was the World leader through the Cold War through to now being in hawk.

            China owns USA now. They bought it for cheap microwave ovens and even cheaper flat screen TVs. Manhattan Indians’ revenge?

            The elite are in on it. The Capstone will be fine while USA dies off to an equilibrium whereby all eaters are useful.

            USA and the other 95.6% of Humanity. Globally.

      • Blackbird May 10, 2021 at 11:59 am #

        The Great Reset isn’t for us, it is for them. We will lose the internet, then the grid, then our lives. Resource problems solved.

        • O.G. Hawkins May 10, 2021 at 1:08 pm #

          They can’t take your soul, BB. That’s what they want. They will harvest the multitudes but you’re Better than that.

          • Blackbird May 10, 2021 at 4:50 pm #

            Been through the combine. The winnowing process always spits me out with the chaff.

          • O.G. Hawkins May 11, 2021 at 2:42 pm #

            Ye shall reap what ye has sewn. Start plantin.’

        • KappaJoe May 10, 2021 at 3:19 pm #

          I had often wondered how the Medicare and Social Security funding problems were to be resolved – now we know. It’s the Great Resetting New Build it Back Better World Order Pumpkin, Charlie Brown, and you ain’t in it.

          • Night Owl May 11, 2021 at 7:36 am #

            Funny, but only partially right, methinks.

            For one, they have told you they want to create an ID system based off of the vaxx rollout.

            I have personally worked on a few documents (editing) about the European ID card.

            You can visit the WEF Website and login. They have documents showing more or less the same things that I saw in the document I mentioned. You can see exactly what kind of data the card-linked database will store, and that is pretty much everything about your med. history, who you are, what you do both on and offline, insurance, etc.

            The WEF folks very much want you in it.

    • elysianfield May 10, 2021 at 11:58 am #

      “They want us to do home hemo but after this fiasco I fully recognize this is above my pay grade.”

      Druid,
      You have my sympathy.

    • Not_GeorgeT May 10, 2021 at 10:47 pm #

      imo, learn how do it at home.

      Your comfort level, based on your comment, is having others do it.

      This should work in normal times. In less-than-normal times your ability to do it at home could be lifesaving.

      3 days is somewhere near average for being on/off machine. Toss in any aberrant situation, 4+ days could become critical. Pt’s such as your wife, not usually emergent, become a system overload around day 4 due to the sudden influx.

      In such circumstance, you would be competing for already scarce resources.

      If you were not competing for a suddenly scare resource, an emergent situation would likely not be in play.

      There is a small learning curve, it really is not difficult, put aside thoughts of “above my pay grade”. Consider the issue and the goal.

      Bonus points: learn a little about ECG and peaked T waves.

      Used/refurbished monitor/defibrillator 3-lead machines a few years out of production are not terribly expensive.

      Maybe I’m overstepping here. Feedback from other CFNers quite welcome.

  14. BeeGee May 10, 2021 at 11:03 am #

    The content is thought provoking as always. The first paragraph is especially wonderfully written as well. Thanks, JHK!

    • malthuss May 10, 2021 at 11:20 am #

      but the messages he offers are grim.

      • Blackbird May 10, 2021 at 12:00 pm #

        The truth ain’t always pretty.

  15. teddyboy46 May 10, 2021 at 11:12 am #

    I was the last man on the gravy train [ government job] . All i do is show my drivers license and medicare card and everything is taken care of. I do my banking online it is all on autopay. This is all very convenient but it is all out of my control too. welcome my son to the machine.

    • malthuss May 10, 2021 at 11:20 am #

      what type of work?

    • Slugoon May 10, 2021 at 12:06 pm #

      Floyd?

    • MrMangoOnMyShoulder May 10, 2021 at 12:31 pm #

      Lucky man.

      Picked the right financial generation to be born into and apparently made the proper choices, you did nothing wrong by punching the right series of tickets at the right time.

      I’d recommend dropping off a bag or two at your local food bank when you can though, but enjoy the freedom. Most won’t. Like the generation right below you.

      • O.G. Hawkins May 10, 2021 at 1:21 pm #

        I feel so awful for the young. My 23 year-old son is getting jabbed.

        “What choice do I have? I wanna live.”

        At least we had a Good run.

        Hey tom clark!

        ——

        I remember being at AAC (home of Leafs & Raptors in Toronto) for Neil Young circa 2008ish.

        All us Boomers got our $15 beers & $50 T-shirts and Neiler comes out.

        A few rows down from us are about 5 or 6 teenagers all hippied-up like Hollywood wardrobe went over the top producing a Woodstock scene. So excited!

        “Sit down!”

        “Sit down!”

        Boomers all comfy for Neiler live. The kids looked so dejected.

        I couldn’t help but tell them, loud enough for all around to hear:

        “Too bad you missed Rock and Roll. It was a lot of fun.”

        • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 4:34 pm #

          Sorry to hear your son bought the fear.

          I hope he will be OK.

          • Not_GeorgeT May 10, 2021 at 11:58 pm #

            One of my sons was coerced, this is after being out on covid sick time until negative x2 in succession achieved Was symptomatic, eventually resolved.

            Put aside discussion of the pcr, he had very real in-fact consequences presented if he did not get the jabs (plural).

            My stress level is through the roof. Multiple post-jab issues have emerged, starting within minutes of jab #1.

            Your job, your income, your health benefits, your ability to provide for your family, your ability to maintain your house, the roof over your head for you and your family is all on the table.

            Be jabbed or else. Science and established medical standards including informed consent be damned.

            Swept away in a moment.

            Fear. Control established by fear. Fear of the unknown? Fear of death?

            Rational thinking: death is an inevitable part of life. There is no true safe place. Life is a risk. Embrace the risk, live life to the fullest as means allow. Be reasonable regarding risk-taking. Reasonable is a very personal place, what risk:reward ratio is acceptable?

            They (Nuremberg Tribunal) executed by hanging 7 physicians on 2 June 1948 at Landsburg Prison.

            The black and white ( oh, how racially insensitive, should have been in color, but color might be a banned word? ) video is rather grim.

            So are the stills of death after life. The braided noose around the neck.

            A companion in the coffin.

            My thanks to JHK for a place to express a few thoughts.

          • Night Owl May 11, 2021 at 7:38 am #

            Thanks for that, George. Sorry for what you are going through.

            We all hope that we are not put in that situation.

          • O.G. Hawkins May 11, 2021 at 2:40 pm #

            Thank you, Mary. I pray every day that my son will be ok after he takes their evil kool-aid.

            I did not properly frame his quote. He wasn’t saying that he doesn’t have a choice out of fear of dying from the virus. Rather, he was resigning to the fact that the unjabbed will have no “life” to live. He’s 23 and wants to take his GF to restaurants and bars and concerts (like we did at that age) and he knows that you’ll need your Sheeple Card for any activity in “life.”

            He’d much prefer not getting jabbed but cannot see that as a viable option.

            Fuck you, Bill Gates! This is my son’s life and fuck you to Hell!

      • SvrzoH May 10, 2021 at 5:03 pm #

        “…right financial generation…”
        Wonder how many are aware that there is a such a thing?”

        • MrMangoOnMyShoulder May 10, 2021 at 8:24 pm #

          Those that aren’t in it.

  16. MaryV May 10, 2021 at 11:27 am #

    A new fear-based system is being sold to businesses by celebs.

    Paul presents it in his low-key but hilarious fashion: https://youtu.be/UvMpeiZVnu4

    The carpet bagging continues.

    All they have to do now is market ‘double plus safety’.

    • O.G. Hawkins May 10, 2021 at 2:26 pm #

      Ya, I had trouble believing that this obvious extortion racket was advertising during pro sports telecasts this past month, Mary.

      “Nice shop ya got here. Looks like you’ve put a lot of work into it. It’d sure be a shame if anything were to happen to such a fine establishment. Guido & I can put our sign in your window for reasonable weekly payments. Think of it as insurance. It sure is a nice place.”

  17. wm5135 May 10, 2021 at 11:32 am #

    Do you think the computer operating system used to run the pipeline will be revealed to “News for Dummies”? Would the most recent OS updates and patches hold any interest or relevance to the matter at hand?
    When those masters of intellectual capacity in DC and Brussels remove the Russian Federation from the SWIFT system how will the contracts for heavy crude be settled and in which currency? Do you suppose that there will be a need to justify an increase in the cost of gasoline? Them groceries ain’t gonna be delivered using tite-lite from Bakken or Eagle Ford. it don’t mean a thing if ain’t got that zing

    Perhaps a look at Ralph Baric and his chimera would be more informing and result in a more informed perspective than:

    “a poison Chinese Covid-19 cherry-on-top” JHK

    perhaps the knowledge that, as one perspective has it, creating a seamless cut and paste virus with modern tools is a graduate level endeavor

    there is an abundance of published papers, instructional manuals if you will, on genentic engineering of viruses. A paper published in 2002 described “creating a synthetic clone of a natural murine coronavirus”

    Mike Pompeo “It’s a live exercise” cherry on top.

    i know, i know, they are telling the truth this time

  18. MaryV May 10, 2021 at 11:37 am #

    The Vax Madness has hit a true fever pitch.

    Warning: The most insidious pap you’ve ever witnessed at this link:

    https://mobile.twitter.com/Ireland2020/status/1387705730380226561

    The PTB are openly mocking us now. Why would anyone in their right mind do what they tell us to?

    • elysianfield May 10, 2021 at 11:57 am #

      Mary,
      I saw four different commercials on the Tee Vee yesterday alone, pandering the Vax. Free rides to inoculation sites, Visit Grandma! The foul race baiting Spike Lee one of the spokespersons.

      • benr May 12, 2021 at 8:39 pm #

        They are now using Disney song melodies with loose lyrics changed to make sense of vaccinations.
        The worst was one of the little mermaid songs.
        They wan t your children with this nasty crap in them even though much of the evidence shows they don’t get sick and mostly don’t pass it on.

        This is about money and control.

        Roll your sleeves up human resources and do what your overlords demand or else.

    • Yohannon May 10, 2021 at 12:04 pm #

      Bars in Miami Beach offering shots for shots. Get it? Shots for shots! Maybe with that Moderna baby….

      • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 2:58 pm #

        Sounds SO healthy! They really do care about our health, after all!

    • tully May 10, 2021 at 12:21 pm #

      Well, they say sex sells….
      I bailed after seeing the photo of Fauci. Couldn’t stomach anymore.

      • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 2:58 pm #

        I couldn’t get through the entire thing, either.

      • abbybwood May 10, 2021 at 3:07 pm #

        CNN says anyone refusing the jabs should be shunned and abused by family and friends:

        https://newspunch.com/cnn-people-who-refuse-the-vaccine-should-be-abused-by-friends-family/

        Some non-woke producer should make a “Twilight Zone-ish” episode showing a couple refusing the jabs then the shunning and abuse drives them to suicide.

        Good times!

        • O.G. Hawkins May 10, 2021 at 4:17 pm #

          They are marching towards The Mark of the Beast.

          I know that more and more of non-believers in CFN Land are starting to see. The prophesies are unfolding and all will be revealed.

          Get Right with God. Ask His forgiveness for all the sins that you’ve committed. Try your very Best to keep His Ten Commandments. Pray daily for Strength, Perseverance and Wisdom.

        • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 4:24 pm #

          And CNN dictates everything these cultists think and do, so we can probably look forward to more shaming, shunning and abuse.

        • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 7:52 pm #

          Smerconish was always a total asshat douchebag.

          • Ron Anselmo May 10, 2021 at 10:54 pm #

            Mary, you say the sweetest things! Don’t sugarcoat it. How do you really feel about Smerconish?

    • Anthea May 10, 2021 at 5:11 pm #

      Horrifying video!

      • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 5:56 pm #

        Right? On so many levels.

        So insulting to anyone’s intelligence for starters…

  19. elysianfield May 10, 2021 at 11:52 am #

    Well, ladies and germs;

    Al Gore…you remember the Honorable Climate Chronicler? Well, an interesting aside…he politics for the removal of cows as detrimental to the Climate, and at the same time invests HEAVILY on a future without them.

    Apparently, he heads a cabal of investors in a company that makes plant based “meat”.

    https://www.climatedepot.com/2021/05/07/gores-fake-meat-business-hits-tough-times-beyond-meat-loss-exceeds-forecasts-on-higher-costs-slow-restaurant-sales/

    Apparently, he will lose his ass in the effort. Why? Because plant based meat tastes like the Devil’s cock (Or so I’ve been told). I’ve tried several variants…Chorizo, Hamburger, a bit of patty sausage….all not recommended. The Texture cannot be even remotely referenced as “meat-like”…the flavor wanting.

    I HAVE been successful, however, in feeding these products to my dogs…the big Anatolian will eat anything, but the Weiner dogs require much coaxing…usually mixing the effluvia with real meat.

    I guess, in Gore’s favor, that it is nice that he has recognized a problem, and further tries to help with a solution…but….

    • gustafson.robert.22 May 10, 2021 at 12:02 pm #

      The most efficient (and environmentally friendly) meat will always be actual meat. Same for gas… plant-based gas is a sink. Plant-based meat is an energy sink. Talk about “solutions” that simply add pointless complexity to a system.

      and taste bad too

    • BackRowHeckler May 10, 2021 at 12:07 pm #

      Part of the new Climate Corps. duty will be to crack down on meat consumption, which is destroying Planet Earth. The Climate Czar at this moment is recruiting BLM & Antifa cadre who have experience harassing outdoor restaurant diners — overturning tables, beating people up, vandalizing restaurants. That’s the kind of zeal, enthusiasm and determination that will get you recruited and promoted in The Climate Corps.

      Brh

      • Blackbird May 10, 2021 at 12:32 pm #

        Time to eat out more often – but bring a little friend.

        • Ron Anselmo May 10, 2021 at 3:39 pm #

          Yes Blackbird, “Say hello to my little friend”. And there’s always the Columbian necktie, but a little more messy.

          • Blackbird May 10, 2021 at 4:56 pm #

            The necktie operation is a bit hard to perform when surrounded by two clips worth of hostiles. Then again, I’m kinda partial to the cold, impersonal touch.

      • Ishabaka May 13, 2021 at 10:02 am #

        You know, we haven’t had any of that in Florida – the first state to pass “shall issue” concealed carry permit laws.
        Had some small BLM protests last year – all peaceful & well-behaved. No Antifa at all – I wonder why?

    • SW May 10, 2021 at 12:08 pm #

      Yes, it’s that Evil Elsie the Cow that has caused all the problems! I knew it. What next? — chickens? innocent-looking little lambs?

      So there were no cows or animals on earth before 1970 when someone noticed the planet was heating up? Maybe — just maybe — the increase methane is from the permafrost thawing and the leaks due to fracking. I admit I don’t know much about this argument but its always seemed strange to me.

      • GreenAlba May 10, 2021 at 12:40 pm #

        It’s not really about Elsie, though.

        I’ve seen lots of people declare scepticism about climate change, but I’ve never actually heard anyone say they think destroying three football pitches’ worth of Amazon rainforest every minute is in any way a good idea.

        https://www.worldanimalprotection.org.uk/news/big-meat-big-bucks-bigger-harm-how-uk-banks-are-funding-amazon-rainforest-destruction?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIrKiEysO_8AIVBoBQBh0X3ggEEAAYASAAEgLmkfD_BwE

        I eat meat, but I recognise most of us eat too much of it. And far more than we need for our weekly protein requirements.

        One of the things that happened post-1970 was that a country with a quarter of the world’s population started developing a middle class. And middle classes include meat consumption in their new habits.

        Used to be that Chinese people chucked a tiny bit of meat in whatever they were cooking in their wok (low-energy cooking method too, compared to keeping an oven going for three hours cooking a slow roast) just to give their ‘bulk food’ flavour. Then they started consuming meat like everyone else’s middle class.

        I don’t intend to eat insect burgers and I’m not a fan of pretend meat*, but I know current consumption isn’t sustainable.

        *Legend has it that the tastiest thing in a pack of Linda McCartney veggie sausages, if they still make them, is the packaging. Old joke, but true story. 🙂

        • GreenAlba May 10, 2021 at 12:40 pm #

          Oops, italics apology!

        • Night Owl May 10, 2021 at 1:44 pm #

          “[…] destroying three football pitches’ worth of Amazon rainforest every minute is in any way a good idea”

          Utter fantasy. More scare porn. And like the Big Lie, it isn’t even superficially believable to anyone with an IQ above that of a houseplant.

        • gustafson.robert.22 May 10, 2021 at 2:11 pm #

          Environmental solutions that do not include population reduction and slowed reproduction rates are categorically empty, false

          • O.G. Hawkins May 10, 2021 at 2:34 pm #

            The Covids include population reduction a-plenty.

        • BackRowHeckler May 10, 2021 at 3:50 pm #

          GA you’ll have to take up the rain forest problem (aka known as the jungle) with the President of Brazil. He’ll be a hard man to convince.

          • GreenAlba May 12, 2021 at 8:13 am #

            I doubt I have ever convinced anyone of anything, brh, outside of my family, perhaps.

            And Bolsonaro is what he is. But facts are facts. And once the Amazon reaches a tipping point and reverts to savannah, it will be noticed.

    • Blackbird May 10, 2021 at 12:16 pm #

      The whole fake meat thing is crazy. If you don’t want to eat meat, why would you want to eat a “meat-flaovred” concoction of soy curd, high fructose corn syrup, and repurposed paper? (Just guessing at the ingredients.) Reminds me of rich Muslims buying beef bacon – do you really think Allah thinks that’s cute?

      But, where there is crazy, there is opportunity. I think the time is right for the launch of a vegetable rights movement. We all know it’s evil to kill a cute little bunny and eat it, but how many realize the brutal genocide being inflicted upon the vegetable world?

      “How dare you!”

      • GreenAlba May 10, 2021 at 12:28 pm #

        Vegetarians are cruel, unthinking people.
        Everybody knows that a carrot screams when grated.
        That a peach bleeds when torn apart.
        Do you believe an orange insensitive
        to thumbs gouging out its flesh?
        The tomatoes spill their brains painlessly?
        Potatoes, skinned alive and boiled,
        the soil’s little lobsters.
        Don’t tell me it doesn’t hurt
        when peas are ripped from the scrotum,
        the hide flayed off sprouts,
        cabbage shredded, onions beheaded.

        Throw in the trowel
        and lay down the hoe.
        Mow no more
        let my people go!

        (Roger McGough)

        • Blackbird May 10, 2021 at 12:37 pm #

          Every good idea I have, someone else has already done something with it…

          But not to despair, the next stage is already in progress: Mineral Rights. Our days of brutalizing vegetables may be in the past, yet we turn a blind eye to the rape and murder of simple, harmless dirt and gravel.

          Peak Stupid – It’s almost here!

      • Yohannon May 10, 2021 at 12:32 pm #

        Still don’t get the Great Chain of Being I see. Plants are higher than minerals. Animals are higher than plants. Man is higher than animals. Angels are higher than Man.

        Among animals, “those that have faces” (the Talmud) are higher than those that don’t. Thus mammals are higher than reptiles. The “aquatics” are very low. So eat fish!

        Stop being a Tofurkey in any case.

      • beantownbill. May 10, 2021 at 2:38 pm #

        I happen to like Beyond burgers. I loved real burgers, but years ago I decided to be a vegetarian, so Beyond burgers are a good substitute for me. Your ingredient list is not accurate. Yes, soy isn’t really good for you, but Beyond is pea-based, with no soy, no corn syrup and natural ingredients.

        To each his own, I guess.

        • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 3:01 pm #

          I like the Morning Star burgers. Also a vegetarian.

          I don’t eat much fake meat though. It’s fun to have something to grill at a cookout, besides veggie kabobs.

        • benr May 10, 2021 at 4:14 pm #

          Fat and salt content are super high.

        • SvrzoH May 10, 2021 at 5:12 pm #

          Low carb – high fat.
          Way to go.
          Belly fat and Pre-diabetes gone in a few months.
          Exercise included, of course.

          • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 7:15 pm #

            Bad carbs are indeed the enemy.

            I try to get mine via vegetables, grains and fruit mostly.

          • gustafson.robert.22 May 10, 2021 at 7:52 pm #

            Yep.

            Shockingly, the diet most conducive to human health mimics the pre-agricultural diet. Whoodda thunk

          • SvrzoH May 10, 2021 at 9:18 pm #

            Dr Oz as a floor mop.

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eeWTqCLatQo

          • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 10:47 pm #

            SvrzoH loved that. I already knew most of it (why I’ve never been overweight) but it’s good to see the misconceptions stomped upon.

    • tully May 10, 2021 at 12:25 pm #

      Beyond is nasty tasting; the Impossible burgers actually taste decent. But the afterburn for me was not fun. Tried ’em twice to make sure the first time wasn’t just an odd reaction. An hour after eating, the acid indigestion kicked in. A whole new experience, as I am not prone to digestive issues.

      My system handles real food just fine; but this lab created junk tends to hit my stomach like a rock. No thanks.

      • MiddlePeninsula May 10, 2021 at 1:17 pm #

        My granddaughter’s mother is a hard-core vegan and her daughter was brought up that way. I used to give the poor little girl a scrambled egg once in awhile until she could talk. At age four, chunks of her teeth began falling off. She had seventeen crowns put in. Ok, the teeth were one thing, but it made me wonder what was going on with her bones. Her Mother told me she didn’t eat sugar so she didn’t understand what happened to the teeth. Hello, fruit is sugar, my dear. She said the girl was tested and she wasn’t missing any nutrients. Yeah, like we all know ever single nutrient a child needs and can test accordingly. I decided it was a battle I couldn’t fight since her pediatrician was on board with the whole sorry mess.

        I haven’t tried fake meat, but I am the person who eats a fiber one bar and feels like steel wool is going through my digestive tract.

      • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 3:02 pm #

        I didn’t like either of those. And the ‘pink’ thing grossed me out. When I did eat meat, I had to have everything done well done or it repulsed me. I guess I was never meant to eat meat.

        • Blackbird May 10, 2021 at 5:33 pm #

          My fundamental rule of nutrition is: “If you don’t have the stomach to kill it, you don’t have the stomach to eat it”.

          • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 7:16 pm #

            Nice rule. I def don’t have the stomach to kill OR eat it.

    • MrMangoOnMyShoulder May 10, 2021 at 12:42 pm #

      Seriously…

      What is the actual deal with trying to strip meat from the general public’s diet?

      We know it’s not the climate (as that argument is complete bullshit…pun intended upon typing)…we know it’s not truly health-oriented (even though yes, many many unhealthy people eat bacon with every meal), as meat provides massive benefits like muscle-retention and iron and minerals…

      Is the goal to make everyone on earth even more unhappy?

      Or is it part of – as the prophet Carlin once more plainly said – “the pussification of the American male”?

      And why on earth do they want us to eat bugs??!

      • tully May 10, 2021 at 1:24 pm #

        My half baked hunch/theory is this whole demonization of meat, and animal foods in general, is to create a sicker, weaker population.

        Humans don’t necessarily need a lot of animal food, but eating some makes it much easier to get adequate nutrition. Some of the healthiest people I know are the people who eat grass fed/pastured animal meats, eggs and dairy, with lots of home grown or farmers market veggies and seasonal fruit. A little grain in the form of bread or rice to till things out.

    • butter56 May 10, 2021 at 12:59 pm #

      While i believe climate change is the real deal, I have hard time believing cows are a major cause. I suppose mammoths and saber tooth tigers ended the last glacial advance by pooping.

      • GreenAlba May 10, 2021 at 1:26 pm #

        It’s not just about cow farts. It’s about gazillions of square miles of rainforest chopped down to grow soya to feed them in horrendous meat-rearing plants, where they’re not called Elsie or Daisy, but probably ‘Bov3290762’.

        • MiddlePeninsula May 10, 2021 at 1:36 pm #

          GA,
          What about seven billion people farts?

          • GreenAlba May 10, 2021 at 1:50 pm #

            Well, they count too, I guess, but we only have one stomach and don’t chew the cud!

            But yes, it all comes down to too many people eating too many animals. And chopping down too many trees to grow too much cattle feed. (The UK used to be rainforest too – pretty pictures of sheep in the English Lake District aren’t ‘natural’, pace Beatrix Potter).

            Lots of people in the world can’t afford meat at all, just like they’ve never been inside a plane or driven a car, so we’ve had a good innings.

          • MrMangoOnMyShoulder May 10, 2021 at 2:19 pm #

            GA – “Lots of people in the world can’t afford meat at all, just like they’ve never been inside a plane or driven a car…”

            Hate to be this guy again…but I’m curious, do you then agree that because of the above truths, those that can currently afford meat, flights or cars should be disavowed of them because many people can’t have them?

            Sounds a bit like “equity of outcomes”, which is a disgustingly simplisic and impossible view of the world’s population that is being rammed down our throats at the moment, a la critical race theory, etc.

            No one is guaranteed a positive outcome on this earth (just ask any jolly lil’ chipmunk when there is a hawk circling overhead).

            So their solution is to make sure no one gets one? At least not the lumpen and/or the rapidly-shrinking middle class.

          • GreenAlba May 10, 2021 at 2:26 pm #

            “but I’m curious, do you then agree that because of the above truths, those that can currently afford meat, flights or cars should be disavowed of them because many people can’t have them?”

            I don’t want anyone disavowed of anything. You’re free to use up resources as quickly as you want. I was mainly thinking in terms of ‘gratitude’ as against ‘entitlement’.

          • MrMangoOnMyShoulder May 10, 2021 at 2:39 pm #

            “I was mainly thinking in terms of ‘gratitude’ as against ‘entitlement’.”

            Gratitude is a given, and hey, didja know that actually used to be a celebrated virtue in the Western world? No more, as most people don’t expect to be held accountable to any higher power. As a matter of fact, they’re taught to laugh at that concept and any who place value in it.

            But I think there’s something in-between gratitude and entitlement, no? How about effort leading to expectation of reward?

            Not that that applies to the caravans of folks in the Wendy’s drive-thru getting a Baconator Double on the way home from work each day before going home to eat whatever moderately healthy slop the missus decided to cook up for the family…but still. That’s their problem, and they know it.

            If it’s available, humans will exploit it one way or another. Taking it away implies we are all essentially children and cannot know any better. That’s what pisses me off…

          • MrMangoOnMyShoulder May 10, 2021 at 2:40 pm #

            They see us all as children.

          • GreenAlba May 10, 2021 at 2:54 pm #

            MrMango

            I think you are seeing something I didn’t say.

            i haven’t advocated anyone taking anything away. And I don’t have any problem with people earning money. I’m sitting, warm and dry, in a home I earned. But I’m aware, when I drink my cuppa (redbush, since you ask), that it costs peanuts because someone far away gets paid peanuts for breaking their back picking it every day.

            “Gratitude is a given, and hey, didja know that actually used to be a celebrated virtue in the Western world? No more, as most people don’t expect to be held accountable to any higher power. As a matter of fact, they’re taught to laugh at that concept and any who place value in it.”

            My attachment to ‘gratitude’ has survived my evolution towards agnosticism. I’m grateful every time I turn a tap on that clean water comes out of it. And aware that I may see a time when it doesn’t. That will be about a week before I pop my clogs.

          • BackRowHeckler May 10, 2021 at 3:54 pm #

            All this talk about meat, I think I’ll grill up a steak tonight.

          • MrMangoOnMyShoulder May 10, 2021 at 6:22 pm #

            GA – I just enjoy your discourse, so I engage you. I’m pretty sure we see eye to eye on most things.

            brh – lol exactly. Beautiful weather to grill up some amazing beef, pork or chicken.

        • Blackbird May 10, 2021 at 1:44 pm #

          And it’s about draining the aquifers to grow the corn to force down Elsie’s throat. And it’s about the topsoil washing off the fields and into the Gulf of Mexico. And it’s about getting us reliant upon a complex but profitable food distribution system, and confused about where food really comes from – or what it really is.

          But the only thing to be concerned about is carbon dioxide. So we need to freeze in the dark eating bugs. I’m glad the experts have this under control, too complicated for me.

          • GreenAlba May 10, 2021 at 2:09 pm #

            Well, in the long run (leaving aside the prognostications of Mr Keynes) we’ll be freezing anyway. The only thing we get to choose is how quickly everything runs out.

            I’m a natural frugalist, having been born to parents who lived through the privations of the war, and brought up in a house where you only heated the living room. A long way from the hair-shirt variety, though, so still a way to fall.

            But when I was married the first time, and we didn’t have much to live on, I kept the heating off for the kids and me during the day, so that Moaning Minnie French husband wouldn’t moan about it being cold in the evening, so my standards are different, maybe. When my flat feels warm, I feel guilty – can’t help it, it’s ingrained!

          • Blackbird May 10, 2021 at 2:33 pm #

            Seems I read something on this blog over the weekend about “sexist thermostat settings”. Glad to see it works in both directions!

            Yes, this pleasant interglacial warm period is coming to an end. Don’t know when but I expect most of us (the non-sociopaths) will be gone by then. Until then, it’s cold enough. My thermostat is set at 60 F, and yet it costs over $400/month to fill the propane tank. I’m sure the Green New Deal will put an end to that frivolous waste of resources, and give us plenty of opportunity to practice living in the next ice age.

          • GreenAlba May 10, 2021 at 2:45 pm #

            BB – I don’t believe in the NGD as a solution to anything much.

            But energy prices will rise regardless.

          • GreenAlba May 10, 2021 at 3:01 pm #

            But that is one heck of a heating bill.

          • Slugoon May 10, 2021 at 3:39 pm #

            $400 to keep your house at 15-16°C? Ouch! We pay about £85/month ($120) for gas and electric with the house around 19-20°C. Alba’s is probably double, based on my sole experience visiting her northern tundra.

          • Blackbird May 10, 2021 at 5:06 pm #

            And I expect next winter to be even more expensive. Time to reconnect the wood stove to the chimney – but don’t tell the insurance company.

          • GreenAlba May 11, 2021 at 11:40 am #

            Slugoon

            I’m ashamed to say I had to check my online banking D/Ds, but I was pleasantly surprised to find the differential is less than I thought (compared to you, I mean) – £58 and £56 for gas and electricity.

            And I’ll never need air conditioning or even a fan because it’s nice and cool inside in the summer. I really dislike hot weather, so am perfectly acclimatised to where I live. Anything over 25 degrees C and I wilt and dream of autumn. Even a hot Scottish summer is something I endure rather than really enjoy!

          • Slugoon May 11, 2021 at 12:29 pm #

            That’s not bad really. I know people moan about the cost of energy but when you think about what you get, it’s pretty cheap. Fresh water at the turn of a tap, hot or cold, the flick of a switch to juice anything with a reliable source of leccy. First world problems!

            Surely you don’t get hot summers up there? (Can you see how Thurso scarred me for life?)

          • GreenAlba May 12, 2021 at 8:41 am #

            When I said ‘hot Scottish summers’, Slugoon, what I meant was ‘summers that are considered hot for Scotland’.

            Like ‘Normal For Norfolk’. 🙂

            Which in these parts is ‘Normal For Fife’.

            I took some friends of mine for a week to one of my favourite Scottish places (haven’t been to Thurso, but I’m sure it compares well).

            https://www.goldsmith-estates.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Glenelg-Bay-NikPanorama-1024×459.jpg

            The temperature didn’t go below 24 degrees C all week, which is hot for Scotland, and too hot for me for any more than a week!

        • gustafson.robert.22 May 10, 2021 at 7:03 pm #

          A human population problem, and an intensive-agriculture-based civilization problem. Not a meat problem in any way

    • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 7:53 pm #

      Look in the ingredients before feeding to dogs and make sure there is no onion powder in there.

  20. scoubidou123 May 10, 2021 at 11:58 am #

    I have been reading Mr. Kunstler regularly for years. For a good couple of years now I noted with dismay how often his entire articles would be elaborations on fantasies he has of the revelations that Mr Barr surely must be about to unleash on Democratic Party officials any time now, or imagining panicked secret conversations between highest-ranking Democrat party officials. None of which ever came to happen.

    Today I am happy to see Mr. Kunstler return to writing the type of columns that brought me to his blog: a grim analysis of american society.

    Now Mr. Kunstler speaks of the lessons of the Great Depression. He skips over one episode: the Crisis of 2008. The lesson: if ever “hazard comes a’callin’”, authorities will not allow the financial system to blow up. They will simply conjure a trillion dollar, and bail out any player.

    “But surely, this cannot go on forever” you would say, and I tend to agree. Yet it probably can for longer than we think.

    • Socrates-Detroit May 10, 2021 at 12:57 pm #

      JHK has performed a much needed service by reporting objectively on what is actually going on vis a vis our country, a veneer of a republic over a reality of elite/deep state control. He is trained professional reporter, and his past writings about the “Golden Golem of Greatness”, and the fact that he holds Democrats to the same standards to which they held Nixon 50 years ago establishes JHK as one of the most impartial observers of what is a coup against a duly elected President.

      What is it about the facts that you find so dismaying?

      The crisis of 2008 made Wall St whole, yes. I bet most of us concede your point.

      This orgy of complexification is simply hastening the the great unraveling. If financial systems are hacked, good luck finding a human to talk to… “please visit us a http://www.noservice.com” won’t work either (not that it works now)

  21. Chippenhook May 10, 2021 at 12:16 pm #

    JHK’s post this week makes me think of a book I just read. 

    The most difficult science fiction to write, or at least the most difficult good science fiction to write, is that which is set in the near term.  It has to have a plausible segue from the present to the setting depicted in the book, and even then the societal changes being depicted have to be believable.  Science fiction “amongst the stars” or in a far distant future on earth don’t have these constraints. 

    In recent years I have primarily read history books but being “historied out” for the moment I recently thought I’d go back to science fiction which I used to read a lot.  Not feeling like going into town to the bookstore I went perusing my bookshelves looking for something to catch my attention.  I have at least a couple thousand books in my personal library. 

    I spotted “Parable of the Sower” written by Octavia Butler and published in 1993.  It apparently hadn’t passed my “good science fiction” filter when I read it decades ago as I couldn’t really remember it in the way I remember many well written books I’ve read. Still, it caught my attention and I decided to read it.  This time I found the book very intriguing, and sadly the setting and plot as feasible. 

    The setting is California 2023 – 2027.  It doesn’t tell the reader how society got to the point it was at nor does it tell you what is going on elsewhere in the US or world.  People still able to cling to some semblance of their former middle class lives are living in walled and fortified neighborhoods.  Police protection is non-existent, neighborhoods are getting burned out by drug crazed criminals, fuel for private vehicles is a thing of the past, much of the underclass hasn’t received any education, and life has become very cheap. 

    In 1993, the changes didn’t pass the plausible test being I couldn’t see how society could descend to the level it did 30 years out absent some defined catastrophe. Reading it this time, what the author depicted captured a world that is frighteningly plausible if current trends continue and there is a triggering event.  Never did I imagine in 1993 the extent of homelessness and their presence in cities we have today nor the autonomous zones of anarchy that have sprouted up over the past couple years, let alone the inability of govt. to deal with it.  I never imagined we’d be at a point where people are allowed to riot, loot, and burn with impunity night after night, including attacking govt. facilities. The uncontrolled wildfires year after year out west and lack of water. California’s all too frequent brownouts and blackouts, and even the mess in Texas this past winter.  Texas not being able to keep the power flowing? I’d of said that was impossible. I guess not.  We’ve come a long way towards Butler’s 2020’s world of haves and have nots (mostly have nots), and though we’re nowhere near the world she depicted in the book, we’ve moved in that direction in ways I couldn’t envision in 1993. 

    Clearly in 1993 it was me suffering from lack of imagination, not Octavia Butler taking unfounded liberties in creating the California depicted in the book.  California and elsewhere has sunk so far in little more than a generation and the failure of that society is accelerating. Despite all the technology out there, the cracks in the system are getting wider.

    • SW May 10, 2021 at 1:11 pm #

      I’ll be sure and read that. I’d like to recommend one to you also — Lionel Shriver’s The Mandibles. It’s set in the near future in NYC as it deteriorates. An old book that’s hard to find but can be ordered online is The Sheep Look Up by John Brunner. It’s a strange book but worth sticking with. He wrote it 50 years ago about the effects of a degraded enviornment and correctly saw an increase in gated communities, boutique grocery stores and wearing masks for pollution.

      • Chippenhook May 10, 2021 at 2:24 pm #

        Thanks. I ordered a copy of The Mandibles. Just as reading history books helps me understand how the world came to be as it is, reading these apocalyptic or dystopian kinds of books helps me to think through where it might be going.

        The hyper-complexity today’s JHK missive speaks of is terrifying in our utter reliance upon technology most of us can’t begin to comprehend. Just yesterday my son was trying to explain to me the nature of how he and the team he works on go about their tech engineering and I struggled to grasp it. I asked him to explain what it was about his background that caused them to go to the lengths they did to recruit him, and again I struggled to understand the explanation. And dear old Dad is not stupid. I have a master’s degree and had a high level corporate career, albeit non-tech in nature.

        I try to see where things are headed In hopes that I might somehow maintain a safe haven for my kids that are out there currently succeeding in the modern economy, but an economy and society far more fragile than they see. I also see the children of my friends falling into one of two very divergent worlds; the high tech & professional world of the haves, or the diminishing prospects world of the have nots whose lifestyles won’t equal that of their parents. Upwardly mobile or downwardly with few in the middle.

        • SW May 10, 2021 at 5:54 pm #

          I hope you’ll enjoy the book but “enjoy” may be the wrong word. Shriver has no sentimentality about her but I like that.

          Well educated kids in sought-after fields will do well for a while, I’m inclined to believe, but what I tried to impress upon mine with not too much success, is simply learning basic life skills and understanding the wisdom of frugality and simplicity. Not stinginess or hoarding, afraid there won’t be enough, but they’ve been raised in a world that never runs out of anything and can’t imagine it’s good to know how to make your own chicken broth instead of opening a can.

          • Chippenhook May 11, 2021 at 8:12 am #

            I agree. My son chose to stay here in the countryside and is very aware of the state of the country and world. My daughter on the other hand is in the suburbs of a major city too far away to have any assurance of being able to get up here in a rapidly unfolding or sudden emergency. She & her hubby think I worry too much about these things so I tread softly and slowly trying to increase their awareness.

            A more recent approach I have taken is planting the seed with my kids to hold onto my property after I am gone. I see it as a place where they’d at least have a chance of making a go of it if things fall apart.

          • Ishabaka May 13, 2021 at 10:33 am #

            Another vote for “The Mandibles”. Also, Shriver’s book “We Need to Talk About Kevin” is the best fictional depiction of psychopathic personality disorder that I have read.

    • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 3:32 pm #

      I’ve heard Octavia Butler is amazing, so thanks for the recommend. Wow that is pretty prescient. I am wondering at all these people who saw this coming. I wonder if they didn’t have an ‘in’ somehow, given what is going on now was planned for decades.

      I have a book by her I haven’t read, bought for a class I ended up dropping. I know she is quite celebrated. Thanks for the reminder.

      I also would not have imagined anything that is going on now would happen, although back in the 1990s I was seriously worried about the fallout from overpopulation. It’s one of the reasons I decided not to have kids, actually.

      • Chippenhook May 10, 2021 at 5:14 pm #

        It is amazing that what is so routine now as concerns the societal breakdown in our cities that it hardly warrants media mentions anymore. It wasn’t all that long ago that it would have been deemed fear mongering to suggest this is where we are headed.

        People know however. Many are leaving the cities for what they see as safer and better functioning locales.

        I think some of the authors of dystopian novels are just better at seeing what might be headed our way. We’re nowhere at the level of the reality depicted in Parable of the Sower but whereas I couldn’t conceive of any of it decades ago, now we have the beginnings of some of it.

        • SW May 10, 2021 at 6:01 pm #

          John Brunner in an interview before he died, said that everything in his dystopian, futuristic novels had been suggested by a newspaper article he had read. The armed, gated communities, grocery stores that sold organic food at high prices to the wealthy but to name a few. I guess some people have an ability to see trends and extrapolate into the future. As the educated, solvent, and responsible decamp from cities, what will be left could look eerily like the old Blade Runner movie.

          • Chippenhook May 10, 2021 at 6:33 pm #

            Where I live pretty much any home that comes onto the market sells instantly. Many 2nd homes are now occupied fulltime by their city dweller owners. I was talking to a realtor today who told me one of her clients said to put in an offer on a home saying they’d pay $25,000 more than whatever the highest bid the home owner received. It is that crazy. People want out of the cities, in my area it is Metro NYC they want out of.

          • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 7:26 pm #

            Chippenhook, I fled to Idaho from CA, and 90% of the people I have met here so far are from CA.

            So I’ll probably get priced out here, too. It’s a rich man’s game going forward.

            I have it better than many, but the future does not look bright.

        • SpeedyBB May 11, 2021 at 2:47 pm #

          John Updike never appealed to me but he certainly did the dystopian well with TOWARD THE END OF TIME.

          There has been a small nuclear exchange with the PRC; Washington is there but pretty much ignored. Here is a short description: “Set in the near future of 2020, this disconcerting philosophical fantasy depicts an America devastated by a war with China that has left its populace decimated, its government a shambles, and its natural resources tainted.”

        • Wizard of the Saddle May 11, 2021 at 9:56 pm #

          I am one of those people. I saw the bad trend lines and got the hell out of Houston, Texas in 2017, just after Harris County flipped to Blue and a host of wild-eyed, multikulti lunatics took over the city and county governments lock, stock, and barrel.

          I now live in a rural area on acreage, surrounded by horses, cats, dogs, wildlife, and vegetable gardens, but not many people.

          Population here is about 1/100th or less than what is was back home in the Lone Star Republic.

          It hurt like hell to leave my native Texas, but I think the place is doomed to resume its’ former status as a Mexican State and I didn’t want to be anywhere near there when the Mexican drug cartels move their operations across the Rio Grande to take up new positions along the Red River and the Sabine River.

    • FarmBoy May 11, 2021 at 6:24 am #

      Wow – thanks for sharing that comment. And the wildfires where all the houses burn down but the trees are still standing. Funny how that works.

      • Blackbird May 11, 2021 at 10:44 am #

        I thought that was curious too. Also the strange matter of white, rather than black ash. And what about the houses left un-singed while surrounded by destruction? Maybe they didn’t have smart meters?

    • tully May 12, 2021 at 6:30 am #

      Anyone interested in near future fiction might like John Michael Greer’s “Twilight’s Last Gleaming.” It is set in 2025, and opens with the discovery of a large oil patch off the Tanzanian coast. The US decides it wants that patch; China who is an ally of Tanzania says nope and that sets off a whole chain of events that I could totally see happening given our current circumstances.

      He also has two other future novels, “Retrotopia” and “Star’s Reach.” Retrotopia was my favorite.

  22. MisterBimmler May 10, 2021 at 12:24 pm #

    The comical irony is that Joseph Tainter wrote a very good, well sourced and very academic book about all this years ago. From appearances, the only people who read it were proles and contrarian agitators like us-who cite it constantly.
    I inherited a Mercedes Benz entry level SUV. The entire thing is so insanely over computerized that a ‘SAM’ failure can mean your steering goes out or all your back lights. And on it goes. Being old fashioned, I bought a replacement part on Ebay and installed it with thre help of some YouTube vids. But looking at it, none of this was necessary.
    A computerized throttle mechanism to get you better fuel eonomy makes a lot of sense, but controlling evry aspect of the vehicle in this way is really just forcng the kind of folks who drive a car like this to go drop a grand at the dealer on a quarterly basis. From Naked Capitalism a few years back, I learned that John Deer took this hustle even further by combining it with the rentier model, tellling buyers they really didn’t ‘own’ their farm machinery. Just a perpetual lease. And they were not permitted to fix the things themselves. Auto manufacturers were watching closely as this was contested in courts.
    I don’t know how our host is on link posting but just look up “Farmers Fight John Deere Over Who Gets to Fix an $800,000 Tractor”

    • Yohannon May 10, 2021 at 12:28 pm #

      Or Kindle. Do you own those books or do they belong to the Cloud, your ownership just a cloud that has touched the earth (fog) and may lift at any moment, leaving you bookless in Babylon, at the mills with the slaves.

      • Blackbird May 10, 2021 at 12:46 pm #

        I’ve had some Kindle “books” disappear. Used to bother me. Now I have accepted that my entire Kindle collection will disappear in the not too distant future. Physical books from now on. (And spare sets of glasses to avoid becoming “the Obsolete Man”.)

        • Yohannon May 10, 2021 at 1:13 pm #

          Yeah, that was the same actor who played both those episodes, right? Not so Beemishy in that one though, eh?

          • Blackbird May 10, 2021 at 1:28 pm #

            The Obsolete Man and Time Enough to Last were both Twilight Zone episodes starring Burgess Meredith as a literate old man in an illiterate world. I think my memory merged those episodes into a single episode – efficiency!

        • Wizard of the Saddle May 11, 2021 at 10:09 pm #

          I have a large collection of books, both physical and Kindle. In recent years I find that I buy 10 Kindle books for every 1 physical book. It is simply a matter of cost and convenience. Since I almost never re-read books I could care less if the Kindle books disappear one day.

          It also saves me the problem of disposal. Most books depreciate to worthlessness. Very few prove popular enough and rare enough to gain in value, unless they are long out-of-print works for which demand remains high. So there is not much point in hanging on to the physical books, most of which I either sell, give away, or toss in the trash after I’m done with them.

          Once upon a time I had the Jeffersonian urge to amass a great library, but after a time I realized that I was not going to become wealthy enough to afford to build a library room in my home to house a massive book collection, so I gave up on that idea.

          Good thing, too. I’ve read thousands of books over the past 50+ years. If I’d have kept them all they would have all fallen over by now in a massive collapse, burying me in my place like one of those pathetic hoarders you see on the reality shows.

    • abbybwood May 10, 2021 at 3:55 pm #

      Like the DMV and other “authorities” don’t already have total control of any computerized vehicle.

      Maybe this is total BS but I read where if we were all seriously quarantined if no vaccine etc., that the DMV could simply turn your car OFF if you were to venture past your five mile limit.

      My mechanic might look under the hood but he also puts a stick somewhere in the car and voila!, there is a computerized readout of a light out or the brake pads having a problem etc. That VIN doesn’t lie!

      And my car is a 2007 Subaru Outback!

      Nothing the government has up their dirty, fraudulent, corrupt sleeves would shock me at this point.

      • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 9:46 pm #

        Wow, I had no idea.

        • Wizard of the Saddle May 11, 2021 at 10:16 pm #

          It gets worse. Most newer cars have an equivalent of an airline “black box” computer recording everything going on with your car as you drive it, including how fast you are going, use of brakes, go’s location, etc. Lawyers now routinely ask for this data to obtain evidence to use in civil and criminal actions where automobile usage by the defendant is under scrutiny.

          So, yes, you paid for a car alright……a car tha5 spies on you and that will rat you out to the authorities. In em huh?

          When I retire, I’m gonna buy a nice old Chevy Impala from the 1960’s, or something similar that I can maintain myself and that has no computer electronics of any kind. I’m done with the gee-whiz, high-tech cars.

          • Wizard of the Saddle May 11, 2021 at 10:18 pm #

            Damn. So many typos. Wish this blog had a function to let users go back and edit.

      • Night Owl May 11, 2021 at 2:43 pm #

        For new cars with internet connection this could be a concern, but a 2007 Outback should cause you no worry.

        That stick you refer to is just an OBD diagnostics tool. The dealer does the same thing to read error codes from your car’s computer system. If you were so inclined, you could buy a cheap one yourself and avoid getting bilked at the garage.

        Anything built after about 2015 could be questionable as far as unwanted intervention, and I would never buy an EV.

  23. Yohannon May 10, 2021 at 12:25 pm #

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9561273/Vaccinated-Britons-catch-Covid-milder-form-disease-study-warns.html

    Wait, they said we wouldn’t catch it. Then that we would but wouldn’t feel anything. Now we have symptoms too? What the hell is going on over there and here?

    Can’t they give us something so that we don’t feel our symptoms? Or not know if we’re still alive or not?

    There’s one pain killed that doesn’t kill the pain, but makes you simply not mind it at all Something like that! You could still “function” – almost like the sacred machine does….

    • Slugoon May 10, 2021 at 2:42 pm #

      Covid is a religion now, Yo. We all have to sit through the daily sermons, and interpretation of the text changes from time to time to suit the agenda.

      I find it amusing that you read the Daily Mail!

      • abbybwood May 10, 2021 at 4:00 pm #

        How else could we catch the deck on the beach in Malibu collapsing with scores of maskless non-social distancing drunk people “watching the sunset”?

        Or see Kim Kardashian’s latest photoshopped picture wearing her SLIMS!

        Come on man!

    • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 9:43 pm #

      LOL, there is no way to prove their symptoms are lesser because they are vaxxed. The vast majority had NO symptoms at all.

      But now young people are dying from the vaccine for a virus that didn’t
      kill any young people.

      Insane.

  24. Horzabky May 10, 2021 at 12:34 pm #

    In France, mail-in voting was made illegal in 1975 because it made electoral fraud easy. That was 46 years ago. Meanwhile, this year, the Biden administration has taken measures to generalize mail-in voting all over the US.The Biden administration knows very well that mail-in voting makes electoral fraud easy. And yet…

    Some people have neither scruples nor shame.

  25. scoubidou123 May 10, 2021 at 12:36 pm #

    I will take this opportunity to recommend an essay I recently read: https://joelkotkin.com/the-coming-of-neo-feudalism/
    It is not exactly Peak Oil related but I think readers of this blog would appreciate. How after decades of economic improvements for all, social mobility, access to homeownership, all these trends are reversing in the western world towards something like a new feudalism. Extreme income disparities, ever greater wealth for a dwindling number, social opportunities disappearing for most others, concentrations of great-paying jobs in a few blessed global cities, increasing precarity for a large number of formerly middle class people, breadown of the nuclear family, all while a new clerisy of mainstream media and academics sings the praise of the new economic and social order.

    I WILL note that he is on at least one point anti-Kunstlerian: he likes the suburbs, thinks most people do in spite of what urban planners tell everyone they ought to want.

    • gustafson.robert.22 May 10, 2021 at 2:17 pm #

      urban, suburban… just two flavors of getto these days

      • SW May 10, 2021 at 5:29 pm #

        Chris Hedges (who can be somewhat shrill) has been sounding a warning about the coming feudal era for a while. Reading the blog posts, it’s easy to see that it’s here. And it won’t be sparing anyone according to race, religion or sexual orientation either. Want your plumbing fixed? New fixtures in your bathroom? A roof that doesn’t leak? I’ll cost ya.

        There’s potential in the suburbs even though it may be unpredictable if it can be realized or not. I think we’re in uncharted waters now in many ways and a lot of skills have been lost that kept the working class poor afloat, simply because they knew how to do things like fix a car, cook a meal, replace a piece of broken glass. The more we’re at the mercy of “experts and semi-experts”, the more difficult it will be for those who don’t qualify to live “in a few blessed global city”.

        • Night Owl May 11, 2021 at 2:38 pm #

          Hedges is a smart guy, but he has not evolved any of his positions that I can tell.

          I have several of his books and still occasionally read sections from Empire of Illusion, which is one of his best.

          He kind of lost me in the Trump era though, choosing like so many to focus on superficialities rather than policy and realpolitik.

  26. Ron Anselmo May 10, 2021 at 12:46 pm #

    An off-topic, random thought that keeps coming to me. The occupant of the White House needs to lose the Ray-Ban’s, especially the aviator style. They went out with sword fighting & nickel beers. OK, I said it.

    • Blackbird May 10, 2021 at 1:00 pm #

      I disagree. Keep the Ray-Bans. Ditch Potatohead. And bring back nickel beers and sword fighting!

    • Paul May 10, 2021 at 1:03 pm #

      HELL NO! I LOVE MY PRESCRIPTION AVIATORS!

    • Paul May 10, 2021 at 1:09 pm #

      Ron Anselmo, hands off the Aviators, or you might just find yourself banned by our host, JHK, whose pic on the top of this website shows him wearing a pair!

      Instead of dissing Aviator-style sunglasses, I would suggest getting rid of the wearing of sox & sandals. Hell of a fashion-crime that.

      • MiddlePeninsula May 10, 2021 at 1:41 pm #

        Paul,
        My husband (aged 78) wears socks and sandals. It makes him fit in when we walk around our golf retirement community. Bahahaha.

        • Tate May 10, 2021 at 4:48 pm #

          Few years back I got lectured about wearing socks with sandals by a snooty little sales clerk. “It’s just not done,” she insisted. It convinced me that I really didn’t need sandals anyway, so I left without buying any & I haven’t bought any since.

          • Blackbird May 10, 2021 at 5:11 pm #

            If ya gotta wear socks with your sandals, you should probably be wearing shoes.

          • Tate May 10, 2021 at 6:57 pm #

            Believe it or not, my feet are my best assets. But not in the ‘jogger’ sense.

        • benr May 11, 2021 at 9:50 am #

          At 78 he can wear socks with sandals good for him.

      • Ron Anselmo May 10, 2021 at 4:40 pm #

        @Paul – Jim wears them well though. Jo(k)e wears them trying to be a tough guy. He’s not one now, and I’m sure Corn Pop never was one. Now Jim can and will play rough, if need be.

        Macron and his boyfriend Trudeau may be quaking in their des chaussures, but I can assure you Putin & Xi are not.

        Biden has already been tried by both, and he reacts like the pussy he is, running to “Dr.” Biden so she can hold his hand. Embarrassing.

        And lastly, how in the world did you know I wear sox & sandals? Did my wife & kids rat me out?

    • Yohannon May 10, 2021 at 1:15 pm #

      I’d rather fight than switch. Bring back dueling!

      • Blackbird May 10, 2021 at 1:46 pm #

        Yo, I think you’d rather fight than breathe.

    • Wizard of the Saddle May 11, 2021 at 10:22 pm #

      I have to disagree. RayBan aviators are timeless classics. It’s mounting a cool pair on the face of a fucking corpse that is the real crime here.

      Keep the shades. Lose the Crypt Keeper.

  27. RocketDoc May 10, 2021 at 1:48 pm #

    My great grandfather born 1856 was named for Millard. Ted Koppel wrote Lights Out in 2015 warning of electricity grid failure within 10 years. Times getting short…the environmental movement blocked a Colonial pipeline 15 years ago that was to go under Tennessee River through Fighting Joe Wheeler wildlife refuge. We said it might leak and wasn’t worth the risk.
    Complexity is the strategy for minimizing responsibility. Can’t talk to a human, can’t find anyone who knows anything. My internet (Comcast) goes off until it decides to come back on. If I happen to talk to someone there is just one solution reset it and call back if it doesn’t work. Put down a deposit to have a technician come look into it.
    Stopped up my toilet on Mother’s Day. Tech said he could run the line for $448. I asked if he would be spending the night and he said no it would only take 30 minutes. I said I’ll use the other bathroom for a few days and see if I can find a better offer on a work day.
    The people who are actually working are charging for it. Inflation is rolling in. If you need it, you will pay.

    • malthuss May 10, 2021 at 1:54 pm #

      where do you live? what town or city? 448??

      • RocketDoc May 10, 2021 at 3:20 pm #

        Alabama. Not the big city. Met another plumber during lunch…$179. Life is going to get more and more expensive…

        • malthuss May 10, 2021 at 3:40 pm #

          food means life.

        • Anthea May 10, 2021 at 5:57 pm #

          My son is a plumber. Crazy busy.

          I got to chatting with a lady about a week ago in the check-out line. She still hasn’t been able to get a plumber out to fix her broken pipes from the artic blast, way back when.

          Construction contractors of all kinds are booked up three months out. My daughter needs mudding and taping done on a house she is rehabbing. Every bid she has gotten is for $10,000, and the drywall is already hung. And more recently, contractors don’t even return her calls.

          I’m hearing this from everyone who needs work done.

          • benr May 11, 2021 at 9:47 am #

            Taping and mudding is easy.
            Sand with damp abrasive sponge and its fairly clean.
            Only construction that is not easy is the concrete work and the framing.

          • benr May 11, 2021 at 9:47 am #

            Add roofing as well God I hate roofing.

          • Night Owl May 11, 2021 at 10:21 am #

            Concrete/stonework is terrible. Did the exterior portion of the “sockel”/plinth myself on our 1930’s house last year and the time and mess are just not worth it.

            It did come out well, however, but I will just pay for it next time.

          • Blackbird May 11, 2021 at 10:50 am #

            Ben, what’s easier than framing? I’ll do the roofing too – nothing steeper than 4/12 please. You can do the drywall and mudding. I agree, sub out the concrete work.

          • benr May 12, 2021 at 8:54 pm #

            @blackbird

            I should have added stairs.
            Framing in stairs, walking joists.
            I saw journeyman still screwing up stairs.

          • Blackbird May 12, 2021 at 10:10 pm #

            Ok Ben, got me there. Never framed-in stairs, but math and I are good friends. I’ll cover the extra lumber…

        • Wizard of the Saddle May 11, 2021 at 10:28 pm #

          I hear you Rocket Doc. I’m about an hour down the road from you and have been repeatedly stunned by just how “proud” some of our local North Alabama tradesmen are of their blue collar skill sets.

          The days of service calls that only set you back $50 to $80 are a distant memory now.

    • Night Owl May 10, 2021 at 2:53 pm #

      We are redoing our bathroom this year in the wake of a waterline break (1930s house).

      Just got the estimate. EUR 20k. Room ain’t really all that large either.

      • MiddlePeninsula May 10, 2021 at 3:38 pm #

        Night Owl,
        We needed to replace a shower and existing double vanity. The bid came in at $28k. No fixtures, lighting, change in plumbing etc.

        Not six years ago, we completely redid a 10×12 bathroom (way bigger project) with custom cabinets on double vanities, custom tile shower, custom tile floor, glass shower door, Moen fixtures, and new lighting for less than $25k. It is insane.

        • Night Owl May 10, 2021 at 4:18 pm #

          Hahahaha. Highway robbery.

          For shame.

        • benr May 11, 2021 at 9:48 am #

          This is from inflation!

          80% of all dollars ever created in American history were created in the last 18 months.

      • Blackbird May 10, 2021 at 5:20 pm #

        20K to redo a bathroom?! For the same amount you can snag a four room house on a slab, off a dirt road, about half an hour north of here. Your neighbors will be well-armed and spoiling for a fight. Make sure you put your trashcan in a bear-proof cage.

        • Night Owl May 10, 2021 at 5:31 pm #

          Yeah. The problem is that here in Europe, land is at a premium, and homeowners are considered rich, so they are bilked for any and all projects. A mild garden renovation can cost 20k, too. We do many things ourselves, but I ain’t doing a bathroom.

          One of the many eye-openers I have had here is that the class system is far worse than in the States. The States has its own problems, but for what we paid for our 1300 sq ft house, I could be living in a mansion almost anywhere else.

          INterestingly enough, there are some “mansions” by Euro standard two blocks from us. About 1800 to 2800 sq ft, and cost between 2 and 3 million. Most also need at least a 50% renovation.

          • Blackbird May 10, 2021 at 5:47 pm #

            Unless you like hanging at the beach with Herr Schwab, it sounds like it might be time to migrate to that Promised Land across the sea. Lotsa land and guns over here.

          • Night Owl May 10, 2021 at 5:54 pm #

            It’s the USA or Switzerland I think.

            Switzerland seems to have been sitting this one out and it has the wife’s vote. We also have friends there. That said, it is the land of DAVOS, and can’t imagine it remaining a haven of any sort for much longer.

            A move to the US OTOH seems equally risky, and the effort required is far greater.

            I really don’t know what the answer is right now, but nearly every fiber of me is saying that we should get out.

          • Blackbird May 10, 2021 at 6:07 pm #

            I consider Switzerland to be the (or at least, one of the) Belly of the Beast. The US is the gun hand. Bigger population to suppress over here. I would expect most Swiss to compliantly board the cattle cars (but so will about half of the US). In my rosy worldview, I think it’s mostly a matter of where, and how, you want to die.

          • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 8:36 pm #

            @Night Owl, listen to your fibers. 😉

            The gut is rarely wrong.

            I had uneasy feelings living where I was in CA too, and then when Covid19 came along, the decision to bail came pretty quickly.

            Much better to be in a suburb at some distance to a city or in the country now I think.

          • Night Owl May 11, 2021 at 3:24 am #

            Black, I tend to agree, but it ain’t that cut and dry. Historically speaking Switzerland has been spared the ravages of global capitalism as does not consider itself in the system.

            This has not changed. One interesting example is that the kids have not been kept out of school and there is no masking in public. They are also the only example of a direct democracy I can think of.

            That said, they are home to DAVOS and international banking.

            As so often, things are not black and white. In contrast Federalism still seems to work in the US, to a degree (unlike Germany), but whether states like Florida and co. can remain independently governed is the question. I’d almost feel safer going to Switzerland.

          • Blackbird May 11, 2021 at 10:55 am #

            Owl, yes I agree there is a lot of nuance involved in a decision like this. The end to this story is: you die. Probably best to do this surrounded by family, friends, and like-minded people. If you can do that in a nice place, great. If you end up cold, miserable and arm-wrestling with bears, well, check out time might be a relief.

            Good luck whatever your decisions.

          • Night Owl May 11, 2021 at 2:34 pm #

            We are going to wait it out a bit more. It is hard to leave when one has invested so much.

            Bleh.

        • Anthea May 10, 2021 at 6:20 pm #

          It used to be like that around here. You could buy a stick-built 2-bedroom fixer-upper for under $20,000–with an owner finance. I know one kid who paid $9,000 cash for a stick built house, and another who paid $10,000, just a few years ago. One of them raised the cash by taking out title loans on several junk cars.

          Going back about 15 years, a young couple bought a trailer on a one-acre lot for $4,500. Owner finance, with a payout. The seller was an old friend of mine.

          You can still buy a single-wide in good condition on a large lot for under $20,000, with owner financing. Finding out about them is by word-of-mouth. No realtor is interested in such a listing.

          The wildlife is intrusive, but the neighbors are quite pleasant–as you would expect when everyone is well armed.

        • messianicdruid May 10, 2021 at 7:07 pm #

          Reminds of Kurt Saxon bragging about being surrounded for 150 miles on every direction by hillbillies with guns.

        • Amman May 12, 2021 at 8:37 am #

          Nice. Whereabouts in general?

          • Blackbird May 12, 2021 at 11:02 am #

            Amm, looking for the cheap housing I described? If so, pull up a map of the distribution of Kirtland’s warbler, you’ll get the general area. Want to get more specific, add a layer of crime statistics to your map. Where high crime (but low by urban standards – mostly meth labs) meets Kirtland warbler, there you have your Boogaloo Bugout. Ironically, not too far from a sizable Amish community (a rare case where I don’t use the term “community” in an ironic sense). Winter 8 months of the year… Propane expected to go through the roof in the coming winter, but plenty of dead wood (ash and oak). Interested? Come on up! And bring a crowbar – got a Governator that needs help “transitioning” (to unemployment).

            Winter Weapon Wonderland!

      • Anthea May 10, 2021 at 6:09 pm #

        I live in a poor rural area. Almost everyone who lives around here has always done their own plumbing. The neighbor lady, a plumber’s daughter, taught me to do plumbing twenty years ago. It really isn’t that hard–basically Tinker Toys. My daughter has completely re-plumbed two houses.

        When she was 16, our pump burned up, and I was unable to replace it in a timely way, because of work. So she decided to do it herself–and did a great job.

        I have never learned to sweat in copper plumbing, but PEX is better anyway–and easier.

        • Tate May 10, 2021 at 7:08 pm #

          Haven’t sweated a joint in a long time. But it’s not that hard.

        • cbeard May 12, 2021 at 12:45 pm #

          Agree to disagree. Copper is harder to work with but vastly superior.

  28. malthuss May 10, 2021 at 1:54 pm #

    COVID vaccine deaths: the numbers point to a catastrophe

    by Jon Rappoport

    A new May 4 report by independent researcher, Virginia Stoner, reveals US vaccine-death figures. The report is titled, “The Deadly Covid-19 Vaccine Coverup.”

    Stoner uses the US government’s own numbers.

    Here are key quotes from her report:

    “There has been a massive increase in deaths reported to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) this year. That’s not a ‘conspiracy theory’, that’s an indisputable fact.”

    “We’re talking about a huge and unprecedented increase—so massive that in the last 4 months alone, VAERS has received over 40% of all death reports it has ever received in its entire 30+year history.”

    “The increase in VAERS death reports is not due to more vaccination.”

    • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 4:18 pm #

      I don’t understand what she means here, misprint?

      “The increase in VAERS death reports is not due to more vaccination.”

      what are the death reports reflecting if not vaccination?

      • Night Owl May 10, 2021 at 4:28 pm #

        Bacterial pneumonia from masking.

        There are many games we can play with the psychopaths.

        • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 8:39 pm #

          Ah yes we can’t forget the disease from masking.

          Or suicides, which I’m guessing they’ve been counting as Covid19 too.

      • O.G. Hawkins May 10, 2021 at 5:00 pm #

        I thought that a bizarre statement too, Mary.

        Unless she knows that this shit is not a vax. That would square-up that statement.

      • gustafson.robert.22 May 10, 2021 at 5:37 pm #

        I thought it meant “the increase of reports is far out of proportion to any comparatively minimal increase in total vaccinations”

        • O.G. Hawkins May 10, 2021 at 6:09 pm #

          It’s not minimal jabs. It’s well into 9 figures of jabs over and above a normal year’s vax shots.

          The statements only makes logical sense if these 100,000,000+ jabs were not actually vaccines.

      • tahoe1780 May 10, 2021 at 7:23 pm #

        It’s not from the total number of vaccination, it’s from the mix – Covid

        http://www.virginiastoner.com/writing/2021/5/4/the-deadly-covid-19-vaccine-coverup

      • Not_GeorgeT May 11, 2021 at 1:12 am #

        I’ve the same question.

    • Tekapo May 10, 2021 at 7:06 pm #

      Stoner uses the US government’s own numbers.

      The VAERS “forum” is not the government’s own numbers. It is place for citizens to post their experience with adverse reactions to vaccinations (and not just COVID-19 vaccinations).

      The website clearly states that the information posted has not been checked, corroborated, verified, confirmed, etc. There isn’t full follow-up of all those posts, to see whether there is a causal relationship between a vaccination and the negative outcome (up to and including deaths).

      “The increase in VAERS death reports is not due to more vaccination.”

      It would be good to have some verification of this statement.

      Is the implication of this that the deaths reported on VAERS are a real increase, rather than as a result of many more jabs for Covid-19? I guess the only way to ascertain that would be see what the increase in jabs has occurred in the last x months, compared to 2020 or previous recent years.

      Has there been a massive decrease in flu vaccination, to be replaced by Covid-19 vaccination? I would be surprised if that were the case. There are about 190m US flu vaccinations a year, and so far about 150m have received at least one Covid-19 jab.

      But it is still reasonable to state that the number of adverse reactions (including deaths) is still a tiny proportion of the total number of vaccinations that have been administered. Especially as many of the reported deaths have not been confirmed as being caused by the COvid-19 vaccination.

    • Amman May 12, 2021 at 8:49 am #

      You should own and explain the last statement in context. Otherwise, a disservice.

      • Tekapo May 14, 2021 at 6:26 am #

        What on earth is a disservice? I’m not a charity.

        Use the search engine of your choice – you can find the tiny proportion of adverse reactions, relative to total vaccines administered. And further, many of those adverse reactions (including deaths) might well have occurred after a jab, but it’s not necessarily proven that it was because of the jab.

        Science is forensic and very picky.

  29. Slugoon May 10, 2021 at 2:29 pm #

    That whole kit of industrial production is long gone, and we’re left in an economic slum of Chinese product “welfare” (stuff for treasury bonds) juiced on computer-driven hyper-complexity, decorated with junk enterprise like social media, streaming pornography, crypto-currency mining, and chicken nuggets

    This is a wonderful line, Jim. The industrial revolution facilitated five billion surplus humans (me included) who are now left with the unenviable task of finding our way back to a carrying capacity of two billion or so. Everything else is just a symptom of this basic problem in my view.

    Richard Heinberg’s book Powerdown looks at some likely options:
    1. Last man standing – competition for remaining resources (this is how the natural world works and deals with such things)
    2. Waiting for a magic elixir – wishful thinking, false hope and denial (see JHK’s Too Much Magic – a lot of this going on right now)
    3. Powerdown – cooperation, conservation and sharing (I’m guessing this is the ‘Klaus Schwab’ approach – sounds great in theory but would end up being a miserable Brave New World)

    No good choices are there, really?

    • Yohannon May 10, 2021 at 5:18 pm #

      4. Fortress America. America First? No, America Only.

      • messianicdruid May 10, 2021 at 7:01 pm #

        At least you’ve learned to say “America” instead of united states. 😉

      • Tekapo May 10, 2021 at 7:16 pm #

        4. Fortress America. America First? No, America Only.

        But I think that is one of the key thrusts of the JHK essay.

        If the financial system (or the gas or electricity system) goes all bloooey – and everyone goes and camps on an LA beach – America is not in a position to supply all the stuff it needs or wants, from inside the Fortress.

        Them days are gone … even food, water, clothing, heat, shelter and transport would be in very short supply, let alone all the plastic electronic gimcracks that keep us sort of sane.

        • JohnAZ May 10, 2021 at 9:46 pm #

          Will you be happy when that happens? Everything you support is pushing us Into the toilet faster and faster.

          One crucial question for you.

          Bottom line

          Why should our government give one dime beyond sustenance to non-productive people? Corollary. Why should have-nots be given the ability to steal from the haves with the government as the middle man.

          Welfare for votes should be illegal!

          • Tekapo May 10, 2021 at 11:40 pm #

            Will you be happy when that happens? Everything you support is pushing us Into the toilet faster and faster.

            Of course I don’t support societal collapse – or any sort of collapse. I would like an articulation of “everything” I support that might lead to such an outcome.

            I could provide an extensive list of things that should be implemented to prevent any sort of collapse.

            Why should our government give one dime beyond sustenance to non-productive people? Corollary. Why should have-nots be given the ability to steal from the haves with the government as the middle man.

            JHK has talked about this often enough … how do we address the fact that really huge numbers of Americans either will not or cannot obtain useful employment?

            A higher minimum wage would be a good start I think. Ensure that huge numbers of minimum-wage jobs are at least attractive enough to bring workers to them.

            And let’s not forget that a lot of the “haves” have their snouts in the government trough just as thoroughly … lots of generous subsidies go to farmers, miners, oilmen, and a whole swathe of others.

            Maybe create a civilian corp – get lots of people into productive activity, so that national parks and public lands are well maintained, highways and other infrastructure are looked after and kept clean, get more people into aged care and child care … there are lots of areas where there are dire needs.

            A little creativity might be required. BTW President Biden came out today and said if someone rejects suitable work, they lose unemployment benefits – that’s okay in my book, so long as it’s not applied too harshly.

    • Wizard of the Saddle May 11, 2021 at 10:42 pm #

      I’m good with Last Man Standing. Very Darwinian, Great way to weed out the lazy, the stupid, the unfit, etc. Mother Nature knows what she is doing.

      • Slugoon May 12, 2021 at 5:40 pm #

        That’s what I said a few blogs ago, better than Brave New World in my opinion. As you say, that’s natures way, so it’s inevitable in one way or another whether we like it or not.

        I think we’ll lurch across all three scenarios for some time first.

  30. CitizenG May 10, 2021 at 3:19 pm #

    Heckler, just responding to your post a few hours ago and wanted to look up the article about the bike rider for Obama murdered in N. Orleans but could not find anything.
    Also had trouble with SBPDL or the initials for Stuff Black People Don’t Like , I guess I’m a lttle out of the loop when it comes to conservative media outlets. (At first I was thinking Shreveport bourough Police Dept. Liason or something like that)
    Can you illuminate me regarding the compaigner?

    CG

  31. malthuss May 10, 2021 at 3:37 pm #

    Did someone mention a fiction book from long ago, with an Elon?

  32. dolph9 May 10, 2021 at 3:52 pm #

    I’ll simplify all of this complexity for you.

    Jews, Rednecks, Blacks, Mexicans. Pick one that will take over the remnants of America.

    The rich, the middle class, the workers. Pick one that will take over the remnants of America.

    My answer: Jews, and the rich.

    There. Complexity simplified.

    • benr May 11, 2021 at 9:43 am #

      Won’t be jews they don’t have enough kids to take anything over.

  33. malthuss May 10, 2021 at 3:58 pm #

    mug shot of serial killer of Kristen.

    https://www.nola.com/news/courts/article_19877806-af80-11eb-ab39-5b7efd2d146c.html

    • CitizenG May 10, 2021 at 4:03 pm #

      thanks for the time and effort, Malthuss

      CG

      • malthuss May 10, 2021 at 4:39 pm #

        buried away, since I could not remember the year and her name.

        murder in the lower 9th. rather often.

  34. sstumpff May 10, 2021 at 4:02 pm #

    This paragraph should be framed:

    “FDR, you remember, was faced with a momentous systems failure, a crisis we came to call the Great Depression. I’m not sure we actually learned the lesson of that, despite thousands of books and PhD dissertations on the subject. The lesson: financial systems tend to expand and complexify at a more rapid rate than the larger economic systems of which they are a component. Their abstract operations seek to hide risk in hyper-complexity until hazard comes a’callin’ and then you discover that the actual money is not there.”

    • JohnAZ May 10, 2021 at 9:28 pm #

      The Depression was not just a failure of the stock market. It was a transition due to technological change. It was also the result of demographic shifts as a result of the changes.

      Probably the biggest was the invention of the tractor, the internal combustion engine. Sharecropping had become the basis of agriculture and the tractor undid the fabric in very few years. See The Grapes of Wrath.

      The dislocated ended up going to the cities to survive, all they knew was farming. They were long term unemployed.

      The history of technological change in the US has caused much dislocation of the economy. Tech change is first order and an early indicator which means the market, also an early indicator is a reflection of tech change.

      We are currently going through significant tech change being aggravated by a completely stupid foreign economic policy. It does not make sense what the Deep State has been doing at all. Trump did the right thing, America First. How much of the American economy will the government give away before the public wises up? If it ever does.

  35. malthuss May 10, 2021 at 4:39 pm #

    Jim Kunstler, in the 00s had predicted DJIA 3000.

    Dow pares gains after topping 35,000.

    • O.G. Hawkins May 10, 2021 at 4:44 pm #

      What’s your point? Do most people making bold predictions run at 100% accuracy or are you Just providing one random data point?

    • messianicdruid May 10, 2021 at 6:57 pm #

      Better to be 17 years early than to be 17 hours late.

    • Amman May 12, 2021 at 8:59 am #

      So? Armstrong predicted 40,000. And YOU chose the wrong predicton.

  36. O.G. Hawkins May 10, 2021 at 4:54 pm #

    Hear that giant sucking sound? That was your livelihood, your pension, and your legacy rushing by en route to zero.
    – JHK

    The world’s most powerful investment bank is a great vampire squid wrapped around the face of humanity, relentlessly jamming its blood funnel into anything that smells like money.
    – Matt Tiabbi

    I’m not sure we actually learned the lesson of that, despite thousands of books and PhD dissertations on the subject.
    – JHK

    The Capstone learnt. The Capstone learnt a lot. One thing that they always knew is:

    Do not loot too regularly. Spread up Big Paydays.

    1987 Crash, 2000 DotCom Bubble, 2008 Hank Paulson Heist, 202x End Game.

    Small children alive for the 1929 Crash are now in their 90s. Old stale academic works gather dust in Libraries while Facebook has the most adorable puppy videos that you ever saw!

    They turned us into children and now we are lambs to slaughter.

    • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 8:45 pm #

      Well said, OG.

      I am wondering why everyone is ignoring the market crash of 2020? It’s like it never happened.

      It occurred just before Covid19 hit, one month’s worth, so I first figured Covid19 was a distraction (and what a distraction it’s become).

      But I do think the 2 are related. It’s odd to me that no one ever talks about the crash though.

    • JohnAZ May 10, 2021 at 9:32 pm #

      Hear the sucking sound?

      Remember Ross Perot? He warned about the sucking sound of jobs going to Mexico as NAFTA came on board. He was an earlier prophet, that is for sure.

      • O.G. Hawkins May 11, 2021 at 2:21 pm #

        Yes, JAZ. I admit that I bought into “Free Trade” in the 1980s. I was idealistic and an Econ major. “Free Trade” would “raise all boats” we were told and I bought it.

        Of course, “Free Trade” was Really “a race to the bottom” for wages and workers’ Rights as well as a complete gutting of North American production of anything but wheat, corn, soy, scrap metal and increasingly complex Enron-style house-of-cards financial instruments and products.

  37. Yohannon May 10, 2021 at 5:29 pm #

    https://dailystormer.su/us-79-of-people-who-refuse-coronavirus-vaccine-say-nothing-can-change-their-minds/

    That’s percent. This life is nothing. As Ramakrishna put, seeds and skin. Spit it out. Eternity awaits us. I’m in charge of our Cell Block.

  38. Trean May 10, 2021 at 5:30 pm #

    In a recent utube interview with Doug Casey JHK referenced the chip shortage. This article expanded on it somewhat and amply explains JHKs reference to hypercomplexity. Yes I know its the New York Slimes but it is relatively well written. I did have chuckle at the reference to president Houseplant wanting to bring chip production back home. Wasn’t that a MAGA policy? Suddenly dopey Joe wants to throw $50 billion at it. If only he’d wanted that 4 years ago those factories would be up an running now….
    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/23/business/auto-semiconductors-general-motors-mercedes.html

    • Redneck Liberal May 10, 2021 at 10:08 pm #

      “If only he’d wanted that 4 years ago those factories would be up an (sic) running now…

      …except that, four years ago, the president was the big-talkin’ do-nuttin’ Orange Man.

      • Tekapo May 11, 2021 at 12:04 am #

        Indeed – four years ago (May 2017) the Republicans had the presidency, senate, and house … they had ample opportunity at that time to activate something. They found time for tax breaks for the wealthiest.

        • benr May 12, 2021 at 8:57 pm #

          Odd I got a tax break and I am no where NEAR the 1%.
          Seems your tired old Democrat lie I mean meme has run its propagandized course.

      • Trean May 11, 2021 at 3:25 am #

        Except for the past 4 year you and your fellow mentally deficient friends spent every waking minute opposing those policies. Even taking the Trump administration to court. Not to mention of course blathering on about how bringing those jobs back to the USA wants just another racist policy. But hey Ho keep living in your bubble it still won’t change the fact that Trump was right in wanting to return production back to the USA.

        • Tekapo May 11, 2021 at 5:24 am #

          Except for the past 4 year you and your fellow mentally deficient friends spent every waking minute opposing those policies.

          And the Republicans aren’t opposing every good policy today? It’s DC politics – grubby and pointless … everything is about getting re-elected. They adore the black cars, panelled offices, the best seats in restaurants, and luscious interns fresh from Nebraska.

        • Night Owl May 11, 2021 at 10:18 am #

          Indeed, Trean. Globalism is the bane of national sovereignty and freedom.

          • Tekapo May 11, 2021 at 7:15 pm #

            Globalism is the bane of national sovereignty and freedom.

            Don’t you work for a multinational outfit, based in Germany?

            The internationalisation of business | corporations has been going on since at least the 16th Century at least. And in fact back in those days the “sovereign nations” created the laws and conditions for the growth of that globalisation.

            Globalisation is an almost inevitable consequence of capitalism – and national borders are just a cost of doing business for any major corporation. Parts for a plane or a car come from dozens of countries.

            If Boeing could effectively make planes in Cambodia or Uruguay they would do it tomorrow. It’s just how it works.

            America (and much of the West) have traded away their national “sovereignty” in return for cheap goods and the free movement of investment capital and credit around the world.

            As JHK talks about regularly, the export of manufacturing has gouged out a vast swathe of the working population, and wreck cities and factories from New Jersey to Wisconsin, and many other places.

            There are very serious headwinds in the future, as hyper-complexity and technical wizardry show their vulnerabilities, and stall in terms of return on investment.

            What I can’t buy is the freedom argument, and as part of that, that Gates, Schwab, WEF, SMERSH, the Rothschilds, and the Illuminati are running things just how they want, using a “hoax” pandemic as a weapon.

            Mostly because events are too big and too chaotic for anyone to effectively control them, but mostly on the logical point that it is not necessary to have big conspiracy theories to explain what is happening and what might happen in the future.

            Economic analysis of the movement of money, debt, labour, raw materials, energy, and products around the world … that is sufficient to explain things.

            I don’t think “globalisation” is the evil here – it is very large (and often monopolistic) corporations having more power than the governments that are supposed to be running things.

            No need to blame poor Bill Gates … not at this difficult time with his missus doing a runner because he was a buddy of Epstein.

  39. MaryV May 10, 2021 at 6:10 pm #

    From Tom Woods (click link below to see the whole thing & graphs)

    “On ABC’s This Week yesterday, Dr. Fauci said we could get “close” to normal by next Mother’s Day, but that there were “some conditions to that” (e.g., the overwhelming majority of people getting vaccinated).

    In state after state, life has returned to something close to normal, and if I show you the graphs you can’t tell which states are which.

    And yet Fauci still talks like this, and some people still listen.

    If you’re waiting for next Mother’s Day to go back to normal, you’re beyond hope.

    I’ve been saying for a while that what we need is a quiz: here, everyone, try to guess on this graph which of these Midwestern states lifted their restrictions at the beginning of February.

    Or: without any dates printed on the graph, can you tell me where Thanksgiving (which was supposed to be followed by a massive surge) is on this graph of Midwestern states?

    Or: one of these two lines represents hospitalizations in the 25 strictest states, and the other represents hospitalizations in the 25 least strict states. Can you tell me which is which?

    Or: where on this chart for such-and-such European country do you thinks masks started being widely used?

    Nobody will get the answers right, because none of this did any good and the charts reflect that.

    Well, I’ll be launching that quiz this week. It’s interactive, so you can click on your choice and the system will tell you if you’re right or wrong.

    If you can’t clearly see a difference in case after case after case, can we start admitting that it’s all been pointless?”

    https://mailchi.mp/tomwoods/backnormal

    • MrMangoOnMyShoulder May 10, 2021 at 6:43 pm #

      Fauci went from 60-70% last summer to achieve “herd immunity” to 85% this winter. Apparently the science changes month-to-month to support the overall goal. 2/3 has been established vaccine science for decades in that regard. Not in this case, this is apparently different. Pull up that mask!

      • MiddlePeninsula May 11, 2021 at 9:07 am #

        Fauci has more stories that you can count. I automatically discount anything he says. If you wait a day or two, he will change his story again. What a POS he is!

  40. O.G. Hawkins May 10, 2021 at 6:11 pm #

    Where’s akmofo when you need him?

    Beantownbill, you’re up.

    • MrMangoOnMyShoulder May 10, 2021 at 6:51 pm #

      Maybe mofo is locked up in The Hague?

      • O.G. Hawkins May 10, 2021 at 7:36 pm #

        Big trouble in Jerusalem.

        Gee, who’d’ve ever saw that coming?

        • BackRowHeckler May 10, 2021 at 7:54 pm #

          Looks like the whole Middle East + Iran poised for some kind of conflagration, OG. Incidents occurring almost every day — unexplained, massive fires in Iran, tankers blown up in the Gulf, Israeli airstrikes inside Syria, Hamas missiles landing near Tel Aviv. For some reason not covered in American media; being covered pretty well by sky news out of Australia and Al Jazeera.

          Brh

          • O.G. Hawkins May 11, 2021 at 12:30 am #

            I knew of the Iranian fire but not of the rest. Thank you for that timely info & direction, Heckler. Much appreciated!

            I must say that few segments that I have seen from Sky News out of Australia seem to cut through the bull shit.

  41. snagglepuss May 10, 2021 at 7:13 pm #

    Never mind Colonial Pipeline. This ‘dust up’ is still in the news as well. Good thing summer has arrived and BackRow Heckler won’t have to pull on his long johns due to temperature drops!

    https://www.nationalobserver.com/2021/05/10/explainer/what-happens-if-line-5-pipeline-shuts-down

    Don’t think the ‘Gov’ of Michigan has applied for the court order just yet, but I sure wish she would stop being such an ‘old meanie’ to Canada.

    • BackRowHeckler May 10, 2021 at 7:24 pm #

      35°F the other nite, snagglepuss.

      Sun’s declination today is 17°N 48′, same as Aug.1. So I would like to ask the Climate Czar — John Kerry — why is it so goddam cold?

      • MrMangoOnMyShoulder May 10, 2021 at 7:52 pm #

        “Cuz climate change. Now get out of my way, I need to get on this private jet to Phuket for a summit to save the world.”

      • KesaAnna May 10, 2021 at 8:43 pm #

        I’m loving every minute of it.

        I once watched , ” 30 days of Night ” and , ” Whiteout ” every evening for an entire month.

        Not because I love those movies particularly , but because the setting in both is arctic.

        I really fucking hate hot weather.

        • MrMangoOnMyShoulder May 10, 2021 at 9:14 pm #

          With ya there! My favorite time of year is when we get so snowed in or iced in (-15 to -30F) that no one can do a damn thing for a few weeks.

          Going to get the mail is an exhilarating experience.

          Then spring comes and I get a bit seasonally depressed…and then I come around to the joys of warmth. Kind of. Fuck the beach. But okay, it’s got its charms.

          We are an odd stock, I guess.

          • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 9:50 pm #

            I like spring, summer and fall much better, but I also do enjoy the winter (for the most part). One of my friends here loves the winter, too, and is not happy that it’s spring.

        • Wizard of the Saddle May 11, 2021 at 10:55 pm #

          I’m with you.

          I utterly and completely detest hot weather. Pretty much everything above 55 degrees Fahrenheit pisses me off.

  42. BackRowHeckler May 10, 2021 at 7:41 pm #

    Looks like that massacre in Colorado was a Mexican affair, a family wiped out at a birthday party by some unhappy boyfriend. Apparently this sort of thing is not uncommon in Mexico, where the rate of violent crime is many degrees higher than in the US, except for cities like Baltimore, St Louis and Chicago.

    Brh

    • MrMangoOnMyShoulder May 10, 2021 at 8:23 pm #

      Well that can’t be mentioned then.

      That’s discriminatory.

      It’s a cultural difference, not a massacre, unless you want to be insensitive.

      Now, if the bad guy’s name was Earl…then you’ve got a story.

    • Wizard of the Saddle May 11, 2021 at 10:58 pm #

      Not surprising. My first suspicion was that it would prove to be Mexicans. Something about the way the story was written. No mention of race or surnames. Those two red flags tell you pretty quickly that you are dealing with foreign nationals and most likely from south if the border.

    • Amman May 12, 2021 at 3:01 pm #

      I wouldn’t point fingers about crime.Tex-Mex or otherwise.

  43. KesaAnna May 10, 2021 at 8:02 pm #

    Ah !

    Another JHK essay that is pure gold.

    I knew it was gonna be delicious when I saw , ” Hyper – Complexity ” in the title.

    I’m biased though. The subject matter , in all cases , was right up my alley.

    I suspect JHK’s Lawfare essays are every bit as good. Certainly , his knowledge of Lawfare trivia is very impressive.

    But unfortunately Lawfare doesn’t turn my crank.

  44. KesaAnna May 10, 2021 at 8:32 pm #

    ” Very diplomatic of you, OG, compared to your repetitive and insistent responses elsewhere.

    Predictions:

    You will not insist Kesa accept Santa Claus postnominals, despite not accepting your hypothesis.

    Big Brain will not call Kesa low-IQ for not accepting the hypothesis he insists only the low-IQ do not accept.

    The interpersonal dynamics on here are always interesting ”

    — GreenAlba

    Well , if it is any consolation , in real life Leftists hate my guts.

    AND Right – wingers hate my guts.

    Whites hate my guts , and Blacks hate my guts.

    There were several reasons I dropped out of high school , but the number one reason , believe it or not , was I feared that I might get lynched.

    ( Another reason I just don’t buy the conventional wisdom regarding the innocence and purity of children. )

    Indeed , Homogeneity was only one of the reasons I moved to Appalachia , but 15 + years later , Homogeneity is THE reason you could not pry me out of Appalachia with a crowbar.

    My experience has shown that living in an area that is 95% one race — even if it isn’t your race , and 95% one culture — even if it isn’t your culture , is simply regardless a less stressful , more tranquil , LESS THREATENING OR FRIGHTENING environment.

    Anyway , it does seem to me that , in marked contrast ,
    people tend to go very easy on me in CFN.

    Why ?? I can’t guess !

    Well , I do have two guesses ;

    Some people have been here long enough , and some are perceptive enough to intuit , that I will go after ANYBODY.

    And regardless of politics , demographics , or culture , the NORM on CFN is eccentricity. So I reckon that on CFN I’m less like a cockroach on a wedding cake , it’s more like I merely make the place incrementally more colorful.

    • Chippenhook May 10, 2021 at 8:58 pm #

      KesaAnna, Northern New England (Vermont-New Hampshire-Maine) has that homogeneity you like…..95% white and unsurprisingly the lowest violent crime rate in the nation. It is a polite and peaceful society.

      • Wizard of the Saddle May 11, 2021 at 11:01 pm #

        That’s because racially homogenous societies are inherently high trust societies. Also, no culture wars to cause folks to rub up against one another like two pieces of sandpaper.

        Ask the Japanese. It works for them too.

    • BackRowHeckler May 10, 2021 at 9:02 pm #

      You have interesting things to say, KesaAnna, which is why, as you put it, “people tend to go easy on me here at CFN”.

      You never mentioned you dropped out of HS, KA. It’s hard to believe. Your knowledge of history and literature belies that. However, if its true, and I don’t have any reason to doubt you, then I was into something when I called you the consummate auto-didact.

      Brh

    • O.G. Hawkins May 11, 2021 at 6:54 pm #

      First off, I don’t hate anyone. I’ve known several people who have earned my hate but I refuse to give them any.

      After that, it is always fun proving GA Wrong so now I gotta give you a hard time, KA.

      But also … We all agree that we have covered that Tuesday thoroughly enough.

      I believe that it is the perfect litmus test as this case turns the usual upside down. In this case, to believe the official story of that Tuesday is to believe the most ludicrous conspiracy theory ever … complete with magic, explosion-proof paper passports, a madman having US Air Defence stand down from a cave in Afghanistan and FEMA coincidentally running many exercises for very similar occurances on the very same day in the very same city blocks.

      All people, including KA, who believe the official story (which doesn’t even try to explain why the PATRIOT Act was already written, printed and ready to roll), cannot be trusted as a source for anything Science.

      Other than that, by all means, KA, Let you Freak-flag fly!

      —–

      Cheers, GA!

  45. patrickd May 10, 2021 at 9:10 pm #

    The USA is now an irrelevant polity in that the world is now hip to its actual role as the worlds terrorist, not the worlds policeman. The world knows the US is a murderer and a thief, a liar and a terrorist. The world has decided to work together to exclude the US from its alliances and partnerships, because it is obvious now that the US is not capable of playing nice, of being considerate, of honoring agreements.

    It’s time for clusterfuck nation and its rabid redneck followers to take a look around and see that there is a world out there beyond the exceptional US borders, and that they are more important than the minor population of the USA, simply because they outnumber the US by a score of 8 billion to 350 million. Also, the world is more than capable of ending the USA threat against the worlds existence.

    Does anyone here at CFN realize that the US had to back down from Russia two weeks ago when Russia moved a quarter million troops to its border with the Ukraine after the US ordered the Ukraine to mount an offensive against half s million Russian citizens in eastern Ukraine? If the Us Hadn’t backed off, the resultant destruction of the Ukraine by Russia could have resulted in a nuclear war.

    It’s time for CFN to start expanding its horizon to include the world because we all know that the US government is corrupt and it will never bring justice to its own kind. The US is irrelevant, but the world is what’s happening now. It’s time to start paying attention to it.

    • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 9:35 pm #

      Actually, all that is discussed quite often, by JHK and the commenters here.

      The only ‘redneck’ commenting up here is a brainwashed liberal.

      Many folks up here are very up on international situations, and understand the US’s place in the world.

      So perhaps, just can the condescension?

      It’s time for you to read the entire comments sections before passing judgment.

    • gustafson.robert.22 May 10, 2021 at 9:37 pm #

      only thing i’m interested in is the few pockets of truly primitive living left.

      great wide world out there is full to brim with sprawling, parasitic mono-civilization.

      • Yohannon May 10, 2021 at 9:55 pm #

        Have you read Ted Kaczynsky? He had deep insights about your pov. That small groups of people living together close to the Earth, trying to survive, will experience greater “aliveness” than any others. What OG said about the Sioux boy circa the year 1300.

        Kim quoted some of his later writings that have been published, apparently. Good stuff.

        You guys may be right about this, though you will still be wrong if you think it will be peaceful or without prejudice towards other groups. War is the natural state of man, be it big or very, very small.

        • gustafson.robert.22 May 10, 2021 at 10:05 pm #

          Yeah im kinda a ted fan

          Absolutely think violence will and should be a part of changes in the world. Also think enlightened perspectives will benefit successful future groups competing for influence and power… maybe even motivate violence in a constructive way, towards something worthwhile

          • Yohannon May 10, 2021 at 10:17 pm #

            In the primitive world, there are typically three levels of violence:
            That of play such as counting coup (touching another rider with a coup stick) among the Plains Indians. Or the throwing of spears by lines of men from warring villages in New Guinea. The men jump out of the way, enjoying their own agility. Injuries common, fatalities rare. Very rough Lacrosse by the Indians of the Northeast, etc.

            Raids for women, horses, or cattle.

            All out War to drive the other group out or genocide them.

            A fourth could be included, namely hunting the other as game to eat as per the Aborigines or certain tribes in Africa. This may be part of the previous or a its own thing.

            Imagine being hunted as game, Gustaf. Or hunting someone to eat them! How cool are you?

          • gustafson.robert.22 May 10, 2021 at 10:37 pm #

            I’m a fan of jared diamond’s studies of new guinea. Lot of wildness in new guinea. Headhunting, unpunished killings. In a sense its a culture that legalizes murder. Yet the cultures, the intertribal relations have stability. The violence does evolve to a balance. A natural justice emerges. Most energy is spent acquring food and culture-objects peacefully. Is it a perfect template? Not necessarily. Is new-guinea highlander tribal life ancient, balanced, sustainable and often beautiful? Yes.

            Could i see myself possibly comfortable in a society in which murder was essentially legalized? Yes.

          • Yohannon May 10, 2021 at 11:36 pm #

            I prefer the vision presented in the some of the Star Trek episodes and sporadically in other science fiction as well. An advanced Civilization realizes that simple living is the most joyous, so it lives that way – without losing all access to the great knowledge and technology that it has acquired.

            The Enterprise shows up some place and sees them as primitive. Then they gradually come to realize that the medievals are more advanced than they are.

            Some people wouldn’t be satisfied with just going backwards as if this never happened or as if it was without any value at all. Those who love knowledge for example. Or say you when your child needed advanced medical care.

            Primitives are always eager for conveniences. It would all start again unless the Civilization kept the knowledge and simply chose to live differently on a day to day basis.

            I’m not comfortable with crime, but I am with dueling. And war will come whether one is comfortable with it or not. Those who have beaten their swords into ploughshares will do the plowing for those who have not. Another reason not to give it all up.

          • Yohannon May 11, 2021 at 12:23 am #

            “Only the dead have seen the end of war” – George Santayana

          • gustafson.robert.22 May 11, 2021 at 6:48 am #

            I agree. Complex, short-lived, resource-intensive civilizations will always start again unless consciously rejected. The height of human cultural development might be consciously rejecting these civilization-building side-tracks, or keeping them in check by some means.

          • O.G. Hawkins May 11, 2021 at 6:33 pm #

            I will add a footnote to your interesting conversation, gentlemen.

            Lacrosse, is the Anglophied way of saying the original Iroquois word. The game of lacrosse played by the Great Lake natives translates as:

            Little Brother of War

          • Yohannon May 11, 2021 at 9:47 pm #

            Ah, I was right. Thanks Og.

    • MrMangoOnMyShoulder May 10, 2021 at 9:41 pm #

      Still the best country in which to live, warts and all.

      • Redneck Liberal May 10, 2021 at 11:02 pm #

        Mr M, where else have you lived?

        • MrMangoOnMyShoulder May 11, 2021 at 7:31 am #

          Lived? Just here in the US, both coasts and the midwest. You got me, RL.

          Traveled? I’ve seen a little bit. Plenty of Europe, UK, Canada, Caribbean, Central America, SE Asia, Japan.

          Fun to visit, but I always preferred coming home.

          For example, it’s nice not to have forty children swarm you and ask you to buy a bracelet every time you walk to your car. Also nice to not see soldiers with massive, almost cartoonish machine guns patrolling city streets or standing guard at the train station (this past year’s Nat. Guard call-ups notwithstanding). Nice to not have to sweat through your clothes each day for nine months out of the year. And in the case of the UK, nice to have hamburgers that don’t taste like they’re made from horsemeat mixed with oatmeal.

          Probably Japan came the closest to feeling like a place I’d actually want to live if for some reason we chose to leave the US. Except for the whole language thing, of course.

          • O.G. Hawkins May 11, 2021 at 2:11 pm #

            Why not Canada, Mr M? Too Police Statey?

          • MrMangoOnMyShoulder May 11, 2021 at 7:19 pm #

            Eh, I suppose you’re right, OG. Canada just seems like North Minnesota to me. Probably the first choice. Then Asahikawa.

      • Night Owl May 11, 2021 at 10:14 am #

        Dunno. Europe is comparable, but different. Some things are much better, some are much worse.

        One thing that I would agree on, however, is that in terms of quality of life and security, the West is the best.

        Unless we allow it to become China. Which we seem to be doing.

    • Socrates-Detroit May 10, 2021 at 10:19 pm #

      Couple of things:

      The US remains, for now, the most powerful nation in the world.

      The US continues to be the most indebted nation in the world.

      The US is for from irrelevant. The US is making life difficult to very difficult for some; and other nations (China mainly, but also Japan, even the Saudis, hold a lot of US debt that they need to maintain the fiction that it will be… paid back–some much needed humor in this space, HA-HA!)

      While we (I count myself as an American) may only be 330,000,000 of 8 billion, since we won’t be leaving America, it behooves us to try to make America work, or absent that, find a space in America that can work for us.

      Hyper-complexity is not only making life more frustrating, but, as if the future was not fraught enough already, it is teeing us up, for even more failure in the future

      If we still have reliable electricity, all these new appliances are not serviceable–the modules are remove and replace, and they are pricey. As people are poorer, how will they replace essential items?

      As to the pipeline, perhaps it was hacked, perhaps it’s something else. Maybe the hack is a real story.

      Some pundits (like Sean Hannity on Fox) are implying “Russia did it”, and asking “President Biden, if Russia did it, how will America respond?” This is totally bogus.

      If Russia did it (and I cannot know), it would be a warranted RESPONSE to America’s belligerent foreign policy toward the Russians. But it could be any entity, or China, or maybe Iran, or NK.

      Our leaders will tell us when they want us to know, what they want us to believe. If the truth doesn’t serve them, they won’t say.

      America’s military today is the ultimate example of “leveraging technology”–hyper-complexity. To paraphrase a South Vietnamese, “it’s a rich man’s army. It needs a lot of stuff to fight”. What happens when the money to keep it running isn’t there? And the US military isn’t just living on borrowed (literally) time–it’s doubling down on ever more expensive systems! In one, two, or five years, we will be broke.

      Basically, the collusion of ‘everyone’ to ‘stop Trump’ has replaced him with a Biden and Democratic Congress that are FAST FORWARDING every negative trend JHK so articulately describes.

      If the Deep State choose to play the military card, while we still can, for whatever reason

      (to secure resources or capital, to keep our society going, since we can no longer survive without massive imports, from this laptop to my cellphone to my TV, etc–after all, this isn’t 1929-1960, or even 1970),

      beside the obvious concern of things spinning out of control, it will make other countries (China, Russia, EU) set aside their difficulties and work to ‘contain’ us. One does not need a PhD or even a college degree to figure this out….

      And if during some stupid war, our military unravels, or if it fails in a big way, if a major ship is sunk, or if the F-35 proves to be in 2021 what the Maginot Line was in 1940, in the “conventional” view of the Matrix, we are done.

      In the “real view”, I think mankind is in over our head anyway.

      But with so much to worry about, distracting the public by ‘pivoting’ from the moronic wars of SW/Central Asia to confrontations with Russia and/or China is really stupid.

    • Wizard of the Saddle May 11, 2021 at 11:06 pm #

      PatrickDickhead – You are welcome to move to India, Somalia, Honduras, or any other shit hole country of your choice.

      That way you won’t have to share this country with all of us “rabid rednecks.”

      Hell, CFN’ers might even start a GoFundMe page to offset the cost of launching you into your 3rd World Hellhole of Choice. Just say the word!

  46. MaryV May 10, 2021 at 9:31 pm #

    O.G. Hawkins, just a little something I came across….

    https://mobile.twitter.com/POTFW_/status/1391303871675486208

  47. Yohannon May 10, 2021 at 9:48 pm #

    https://www.news.com.au/world/coronavirus/leaked-chinese-document-reveals-a-sinister-plan-to-unleash-coronaviruses/news-story/53674e8108ad5a655e07e990daa85465

    This is probably the next one, maybe the one labelled “Spars” by John Hopkins scheduled for 2025. The one of which Gates said, “The next one will make them take notice.”

    I’m not convinced “covid19” is really anything at all. The reaction to it, both the lockdown and the vaccine, are major killers of course.

    • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 10:15 pm #

      Same. As you know, I believe they just rebranded the naturally occurring one and wreaked havoc with clever marketing campaigns and mass hysteria through the politicians and mainstream media.

      Who knows what’s coming next. I do know they won’t stop.

      • Yohannon May 10, 2021 at 10:21 pm #

        They were raving tonight about how the next Flu season might be terrible because we’ve lost immunity because this one was so light, lol. What’s next? How about mRna flu shots, in addition to Covid boosters Of Course!

        • JohnAZ May 10, 2021 at 11:11 pm #

          Y

          I smell the government’s stench on this statement. Sowing fear for control

          My point all along is the unknown aspects of all this Covid business. I am 73, I never got it, I wore a mask only in close quarters to stop people from spitting on me, and I got vaxxed twice.

          The flu is not near as contagious as Covid. So when most people protect themselves from Covid, Lo and behold, flu is affected.

          So? One thing that pisses me of more than anything is the way the government health agencies have ignored their job for a long time. Your flu question should already be answered, if we limit transmission of the flu, does our immunity to it affected? Will next year be worse? Who the heck knows, and we should know. SARS1 gave us a preview of Covid. What did we learn from it?

          Nothing. What the heck is the CDC even there for?

          Covid boosters? I know you are being sarcastic, but my point is that we should already know, with 44000 test candidates nearing a year since their first shots whether the memory cells are generated or whether the immune event only produces antibodies. Is this a MMR style immunity, life long or a flu shot seasonal. I know that Moderna is gearing up for a fall vaxx event and I will bet Pfizer is the same.

          I think that the flu shot will always be as it is, injection of pieces of dead flu viruses. Why mRNA was used as the catalyst for the Covid shot, I do not know? My best guess is it is a precursor for the treatment of immunity assisted cancer treatment. Does the transmission of mRNA into cells for the expression of antigens for the immune system to attack and develop immunity.

          What can we pick off of cancer cells that can be made into mRNA injections to alarm the immune system of the presence of cancer sells? Are we heading this way? Where are the spokesmen for the industry to explain all this stuff? Do not say a word! Shhhh!

          Let the fear arise, gain control, be a Democrat.

          • JohnAZ May 10, 2021 at 11:18 pm #

            Is the transmission of mRNA into cells to express antigens for the immune system to attack, a new technology to help the immune system identify and amplify new antigens? Cancer?

          • Redneck Liberal May 10, 2021 at 11:23 pm #

            “My best guess is it is a precursor for the treatment of immunity assisted cancer treatment.

            JohnAZ – that’s a fair assumption (and this new technology has been hailed by many scientists). However, the whole idea of TPTB trying to ASSIST the human race rather than invoke a genocidal event will not get much traction round here.

          • Yohannon May 10, 2021 at 11:25 pm #

            This process is amendable to mass production, since it is essentially a computer code. And it enables to a mechanical process to commence in the body, unrelated to the body’s own mechanism of homeostasis.

        • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 11:30 pm #

          I keep revisiting the machinations of Mr. McBean, the Fix-It-Up Chappie, in Dr. Seuss’s “Sneetches on Beaches”.

          They will have us going round and round from virus to vaxx until our money’s gone (and our health too).

          Sneetches has a good ending when their money runs out, and that ends the bigotry and stupidity and they just have a laugh.

          If only that would happen among humans.

      • Socrates-Detroit May 10, 2021 at 10:23 pm #

        I think some of you will find this interesting, and find some things you can use on your doubting friends.

        It’s a long read, but the author has some credentials:

        https://nicholaswade.medium.com/origin-of-covid-following-the-clues-6f03564c038

      • Redneck Liberal May 10, 2021 at 11:00 pm #

        “I believe they just rebranded the naturally occurring one”

        Oh? So, it’s NOT a gain-of-function bioweapon, developed by the evil Dr. Fauxi and distributed by the Chinese to destroy the West?

        The diversity of conspiracies is mind-boggling. No wonder no one can figure out which one is real…

        • Yohannon May 10, 2021 at 11:22 pm #

          Yes, Fauci signed off on using tax payer dollars to develop gain of function bioweapons. The scumbags put a loophole in the law to allow for this.

          • Redneck Liberal May 10, 2021 at 11:24 pm #

            Better have Mary get her story straight with yours, Yoyo…

          • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 11:25 pm #

            Poor RL doesn’t understand that both things can be true. It’s that black/white IDPol limited thinking thing that results from TDS and other brainwashing.

          • MrMangoOnMyShoulder May 11, 2021 at 7:41 am #

            Why would anyone here need to get their stories straight with anyone else here, RL?

        • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 11:24 pm #

          No, I don’t believe this nothingburger is a gain of function bioweapon. So please stop attributing other peoples’ opinion to me. If you can’t keep track of who says what, maybe use post-its?

          • Redneck Liberal May 10, 2021 at 11:29 pm #

            I actually don’t care which nutjob holds & espouses which nutjob theory, MaryQ. The irony was lost on you, clearly.

            Anyway…

            “A poll today by the Associated Press (AP) and the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) shows that President Joe Biden’s administration is gaining positive traction. Sixty-three percent of Americans approve of how he is handling his job as president. Seventy-one percent approve of how he is handling the coronavirus pandemic; 62% percent approve of how he is handling health care. Fifty-seven percent approve of how he is handling the economy; 54% approve of how he is handling foreign affairs.
            Fifty-four percent of Americans think the country is going in the right direction. This is the highest number since 2017, but it is split by party: 84% of Democrats like the country’s direction, while only 20% of Republicans do.

          • Tekapo May 11, 2021 at 12:20 am #

            “Fifty-four percent of Americans think the country is going in the right direction. This is the highest number since 2017, but it is split by party: 84% of Democrats like the country’s direction, while only 20% of Republicans do.“

            What puzzles me, is why the Republican leadership is still so beholden to the Trump aura.

            I appreciate that a large number of Republican voters still fervently believe in the goodness and power of Trump, but you would think it is far more important to work through policies for 2022, rather than have internecine battles over Liz Cheney, and cancel-culture distractions.

            They look very self-destructive at the moment.

            It’s also a requirement – if they wish to win elections – for the Republicans to win over independent | swing | floating voters. It seems that support from these groups have really dropped since Jan 6, and the GOP has to work hard to get them back – their solid base of 40-45% is not enough to win a wide range of critical races in the House and Senate.

            Interesting times ahead, but President Biden’s overall popularity, and Republican disarray doesn’t look too healthy for the GOP at the moment.

          • MaryV May 11, 2021 at 12:42 am #

            Oh lookie, it’s 2 of the Troll Triumvirate who think I care what they post.

            LMAO, flattered anew. Yap, yap, little doggies.

            The TDS-addled who fell for Bleachgate, Russiagate and Capitol Stormgate are too low in debate skills to have adult convos with.

            Sorry boys.

          • Tekapo May 11, 2021 at 1:55 am #

            LMAO, flattered anew. Yap, yap, little doggies.

            How are your in-depth conversations with Jack Daniels tonight? Productive?

          • MaryV May 11, 2021 at 10:58 am #

            Projection noted. 😉

          • O.G. Hawkins May 11, 2021 at 6:24 pm #

            Jack Daniels acts like your friend.

        • Tekapo May 11, 2021 at 12:53 am #

          The diversity of conspiracies is mind-boggling. No wonder no one can figure out which one is real…

          Yes – it can be hard to keep up. Not that I concern myself too much … I stick with the real world.

          • Night Owl May 11, 2021 at 4:01 am #

            “Donald Trump wants to usher in a White Ethnostate”

            –Tekapo

          • benr May 11, 2021 at 9:39 am #

            What real world?
            The one msnbc and cnn tells you to believe in?
            You are as stuck in the matrix as anyone has ever been in human history.

          • MaryV May 11, 2021 at 10:56 am #

            Tinfoil Russiagater says what? LOL.

        • Night Owl May 11, 2021 at 4:02 am #

          It is a GoF bioweapon released by Putin to stop the Resistance.

          Redneck Liberal told me.

          • Redneck Liberal May 11, 2021 at 7:46 am #

            Spot the Narc Troll in this video:

            https://youtu.be/htPBiuebbxc

          • MaryV May 11, 2021 at 10:57 am #

            LOL.

          • MaryV May 11, 2021 at 11:47 am #

            This is a guy with actual talent:

            https://rumble.com/vgtd1n-this-fauci-impersonation-is-hilarious.html

          • O.G. Hawkins May 11, 2021 at 2:06 pm #

            “Oh, shit no, Justin. You ain’t ANTIFA! They’re skinny.”

            Hahaha

          • Night Owl May 12, 2021 at 8:04 am #

            I could only take about 15 seconds of this low-T ensemble, but if you want to include me, you need to find a dude who is about 6 ft tall/185, fit and sporting a band related t-shirt (Smiths, SDRE or anything postpunk will do), a pair of dark skinnyish jeans with New Balance 996s, and a beat Rolex Explorer II on his wrist.

            I also have a very full beard right now.

            Look forward to your production.

  48. Yohannon May 10, 2021 at 10:10 pm #

    Natural New, Ethan Huff

    An Israeli organization made up of health experts has published a report outlining how the Wuhan coronavirus (Covid-19) injection from Pfizer causes damage to nearly every system in the human body.

    The Israeli People Committee (IPC) says that Pfizer’s Chinese Virus jab is causing catastrophic damage to people’s bodies – so much so, in fact, that there are more people dying from it in Israel than there are people in all of Europe who are dying from the AstraZeneca jab.

    You know things are bad when the bar has been so lowered that it is now considered a privilege to have a jab that causes just a wee-bit fewer deaths than the one your own government is mandating.

    According to IPC, “there has never been a vaccine that has harmed as many people” as the Pfizer vaccine has. The group published a full report detailing its eye-opening findings.

    “We received 288 death reports in proximity to vaccination (90% up to 10 days after the vaccination),” one part of the report explains. “64% of those were men.”

    Meanwhile, Israel’s official Ministry of Health is claiming that “only 45 deaths in Israel were vaccine related.”

    Assuming these figures are accurate, the Israeli government is blatantly lying about the number of Israelis who are being injured or killed by the Pfizer injection, which appears to be the jab of choice for the Israeli people.

    All Covid-19 injections are dangerous and deadly
    All of this is even more concerning when considering the fact that the only jabs governments around the world have been focusing on as dangerous are the ones from AstraZeneca and Johnson & Johnson (J&J).

    Both of these just so happen to be the only two that are not loaded with DNA-reprogramming mRNA chemicals. The J&J and AstraZeneca injections are considered to be more “traditional” in terms of the technology used.

    Meanwhile, Pfizer’s jab is killing people left and right in Israel, and Moderna’s is not much better, and we have not heard so much as a peep from the government about “pausing” either of those.

    In Europe, where AstraZeneca’s injection is being widely used, numerous countries have suspended its use entirely, citing a pandemic of deadly blood clots and other adverse effects.

    German scientists recently discovered the two-step process by which AstraZeneca injections cause blood clots in recipients. There is a series of events that must first take place inside the body before the blood clots form.

    Still, AstraZeneca’s injection is reportedly causing far fewer deaths than Pfizer’s, and yet neither Israel nor the United States has hit the pause button on its administration.

    Not only that, but the J&J jab, which causes deadly blood clots just like AstraZeneca’s jab, is now being actively recommended by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in American patients, albeit with a tiny safety warning on the package.

    “According to Central Bureau of Statistics data during January-February 2021, at the peak of the Israeli mass vaccination campaign, there was a 22% increase in overall mortality in Israel compared with the previous year,” the Israeli report further explains about what is happening over there.

    “In fact, January-February 2021 have been the deadliest months in the last decade, with the highest overall mortality rates compared to corresponding months in the last 10 years.”

    The most dramatic increases in death are occurring among Israelis between the ages of 20 and 29. This group has seen an overall increase in mortality of 32 percent ever since the Pfizer vaccine was introduced.

    “According to this estimate, it is possible to estimate the number of deaths in Israel in proximity of the vaccine, as of today, at about 1000-1100 people.”

    The latest news about Wuhan coronavirus (Covid-19) injections can be found at ChemicalViolence.com.

    Sources for this article include:

    GreatGameIndia.com

    NaturalNews

    Yoho: But focusing on the damage done by the lesser vaccines, the slow boats to China as it were, are they attempting to stampede the herd to the two deadly ones, the fast boats to the Grave or Transhumanist Golemhood?

    • Tekapo May 11, 2021 at 2:22 am #

      “We received 288 death reports in proximity to vaccination (90% up to 10 days after the vaccination),” one part of the report explains. “64% of those were men.”

      Meanwhile, Israel’s official Ministry of Health is claiming that “only 45 deaths in Israel were vaccine related.”

      It’s hard sometimes to determine where to look to see what the real picture is.

      But if push comes to shove, I’d tend to follow the government figures. Other outfits always seem to have an agenda, or their data is faulty (someone dies after being vaccinated, so the vaccine “must” have caused the death, and so on).

    • Tekapo May 11, 2021 at 2:26 am #

      Both of these just so happen to be the only two that are not loaded with DNA-reprogramming mRNA chemicals.

      This is crazy stuff … the vaccines do not “re-program” anyone’s DNA – it’s simply not possible. The article is essentially science and medical knowledge free. But believe it if you wish … there is no vaccine for credulous.

    • Night Owl May 11, 2021 at 5:35 am #

      Good article. Inline with what Dr. Wolfgang Wodarg and others over at Stiftung Corona-Ausschuss have been reporting.

      Their international class action lawsuit is being pieced together and they have about 1,000 lawyers working on it and some 10,000 medical professionals.

      Wooo!

      • MaryV May 11, 2021 at 10:54 am #

        That is exciting, indeed.

        Today, Peggy Hall and Leigh Dundas are going to deliver some reality to the Orange County city council who’s attempting to start requiring vaxx passports. Those two have a 2-0 winning streak dealing with these psychos. I can’t wait to see the video.

  49. MaryV May 10, 2021 at 11:22 pm #

    BOOM!! The evil Disney corp. is exposed for their insane ‘diversity’ CRT/anti-racism/pro-trans agenda indoctrination. It’s not just in higher learning. In fact, it seems even more insidious in the corporate world.

    “The Walt Disney Corporation famously bills its amusement parks as “the happiest place on Earth,” but inside the company’s headquarters in Burbank, California, a conflict is brewing. In the past year, Disney executives have elevated the ideology of critical race theory into a new corporate dogma, bombarded employees with trainings on “systemic racism,” “white privilege,” “white fragility,” and “white saviors,” and launched racially segregated “affinity groups” at the company’s headquarters.

    I have obtained a trove of whistleblower documents related to Disney’s “diversity and inclusion” program, called “Reimagine Tomorrow,” which paints a disturbing picture of the company’s embrace of racial politics. Multiple Disney employees, who requested anonymity out of fear of reprisals, told me that the Reimagine Tomorrow program, though perhaps noble in intent, has become deeply politicized and engulfed parts of the company in racial conflict.

    The core of Disney’s racial program is a series of training modules on “antiracism.” In one, called “Allyship for Race Consciousness,” the company tells employees that they must “take ownership of educating [themselves] about structural anti-Black racism” and that they should “not rely on [their] Black colleagues to educate [them],” because it is “emotionally taxing.” The United States, the document claims, has a “long history of systemic racism and transphobia,” and white employees, in particular, must “work through feelings of guilt, shame, and defensiveness to understand what is beneath them and what needs to be healed.” Disney recommends that employees atone by “challeng[ing] colorblind ideologies and rhetoric” such as “All Lives Matter” and “I don’t see color”; they must “listen with empathy [to] Black colleagues” and must “not question or debate Black colleagues’ lived experience.”

    In another module, called “What Can I Do About Racism?,” Disney tells employees that they should reject “equality,” with a focus on “equal treatment and access to opportunities,” and instead strive for “equity,” with a focus on “the equality of outcome.” The training also includes a series of lessons on “implicit biases,” “microaggressions,” and “becoming an antiracist.” The company tells employees that they must “reflect” on America’s “racist infrastructure” and “think carefully about whether or not your wealth, income, treatment by the criminal justice system, employment, access to housing, health care, political power, and education might be different if you were of a different race.”

    In order to put these ideas into action, Disney sponsored the creation of the “21-Day Racial Equity and Social Justice Challenge” in partnership with the YWCA and included the program in its recommended resources for employees. The challenge begins with information on “systemic racism” and asks participants to accept that they have “all been raised in a society that elevates white culture over others.” Participants then learn about their “white privilege” and are asked to fill out a white privilege “checklist,” with options including: “I am white,” I am heterosexual,” “I am a man,” “I still identity as the gender I was born in,” “I have never been raped,” “I don’t rely on public transportation,” and “I have never been called a terrorist.”

    Next, participants learn about “white fragility” and are asked to complete an exercise called “How to Tell If You Have White Fragility.” The program interprets beliefs such as “I am a good person, I can’t be racist” and “I was taught to treat everyone the same” as evidence of the participant’s internalized racism and white fragility. Finally, at the conclusion of the 21-day challenge, participants are told that they must learn how to “pivot” from “white dominant culture” to “something different.” The document claims that “competition,” power hoarding,” “comfort with predominantly white leadership,” “individualism,” “timeliness,” and “comprehensiveness” are “white dominant” values that “perpetuate white supremacy culture”—and must be rejected.

    In the same collection of resources, Disney also recommends that employees read a series of how-to guides, including “75 Things White People Can Do for Racial Justice” and “Your Kids Are Not Too Young to Talk About Race.” The first article suggests that white employees should “defund the police,” “participate in reparations,” “decolonize your bookshelf,” “don’t gentrify neighborhoods,” “find and join a local ‘white space,’” and “donate to anti-white supremacy work such as your local Black Lives Matter Chapter.” The second article encourages parents to commit to “raising race-consciousness in children” and argues that “even babies discriminate” against members of other races. A graphic claims that babies show the first signs of racism at three months old, and that white children become “strongly biased in favor whiteness” by age four.

    Finally, as part of an initiative labeled “CEO sponsored priorities,” Disney has launched racially segregated “affinity groups” for minority employees, with the goal of achieving “culturally-authentic insights.” In the original launch, the Latino affinity group was called “Hola,” the Asian affinity group was called “Compass,” and the black affinity group was called “Wakanda.” The racial affinity groups, also called Business Employee Resource Groups (BERGs), are technically open to all employees but in practice have become almost entirely segregated by race, with the occasional exception for white “executive champions” who attend on behalf of corporate leadership. “The thing that this company does very well is they know politics, so they leave many things unspoken,” said one employee, a racial minority, who also claimed the affinity groups are intended to be racially segregated spaces. “I don’t think anyone has necessarily even tried to attend something that they would discover that they’re not welcome at.”

    Multiple Disney employees told me the political environment at the company has intensified in recent months. There are “almost daily memos, suggested readings, panels, and seminars that [are] all centered around antiracism,” said one employee. The company is “completely ideologically one-sided” and actively discourages conservative and Christian employees from expressing their views. “I attended several [training sessions] at the beginning just to see what the temperature of the discussion would be and to gauge if I would be able to bring up my own objections in a safe way—safe meaning for my career. And I’ve continually gotten the unspoken answer: ‘no,’” said the employee. “It’s been very stifling to feel like everyone keeps talking about having open dialogue and compassionate conversations, but when it comes down to it, I know if I said one thing that was truthful, based on data, or even just based on my own personal experience, it would actually be rather unwelcomed.”

    Despite these internal warnings, there is no sign that Disney is slowing down its efforts to achieve ideological purity. The company recently fired actress Gina Carano for expressing a conservative viewpoint. Content managers have modified and added “content advisories” to films such as Dumbo, Aladdin, and Fantasia, which, according to an internal video I have obtained, executives have denounced as “racist content.” In the same video, executive chairman Bob Iger pledged that the company “should be taking a stand” on political controversies and will no longer “shy away from politics” in the future.

    Disney’s premise has always been to provide an escape for middle Americans, but its executives seem to harbor growing contempt for the very people who visit their amusement parks, watch their films, and buy their merchandise. Once known as the “Happiest Place on Earth,” Disney has now committed to becoming the “wokest place on Earth”—whatever the cost.”

    Christopher F. Rufo is a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute and a contributing editor of City Journal.

    https://www.city-journal.org/racial-politics-at-disney

    • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 11:38 pm #

      FWIW, this is what I am now experiencing at the college I work at, as well. It is like a disease.

      Good luck having an independent opinion or thought. Out the door with your ass if you do.

      • Blackbird May 11, 2021 at 12:05 pm #

        I thought the purpose of having a job was to do some work and get paid for it. Guess I missed the memo.

        Disney made some great animated films before they went woke and perved. Hope you all save them to an external hard drive before they get censored or cancelled. As they say, “Power corrupts”.

        • MaryV May 11, 2021 at 7:41 pm #

          I always thought their movies were super emotionally manipulating. Not my bag.

          • Blackbird May 11, 2021 at 10:17 pm #

            I find Tchaikovsky, Beethoven, and Pink Floyd emotionally manipulative, I think that’s what I like about them. Heart strings, the hidden instrument in the symphony.

          • SpeedyBB May 12, 2021 at 7:19 am #

            Nicknames for their place of employment, by the animation slaves at Disney: “Mouseschwitz” and “Duckau”.

          • GreenAlba May 13, 2021 at 7:46 am #

            “Heart strings, the hidden instrument in the symphony.”

            Nice one. I remember crying to Bruch’s 1st Violin concerto when I was a student. After a night out, not a few drinks, and fancying someone. But still. 🙂

            Call it sentimental pap if you will (not you), I still have my Nigel Kennedy rendition and it still tugs the heart strings.

            I read maybe a decade ago that it’s the UK’s favourite bit of classical music. Bunch of sentimental saps we are.

    • JohnAZ May 10, 2021 at 11:38 pm #

      MaryV

      I remember that the purpose of every corporation is to make profit, right?

      What the heck is going on? Where is all this self glorification coming from? Why the heck do all these jerky corporate boards even care what disparate groups of the country think anyway?

      Does the location of the corporate offices have anything to do with it, ie are blue state corporations Blue?

      What happened to e pluribus unum? What a thought. A system where everyone fits into places where their talents and gifts entitle them to.

      Just the opposite of what the woke crowd wants.

      • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 11:45 pm #

        Their purpose is no longer to make a profit. They’re getting Covid19 money out the whazoo.

        So the customer can go to hell, so can the employees. They probably want to get rid of all independent thinkers so they can have compliant serfs.

        All this CRT bullshit is just a means to an end – technofeudal serfdom. It’s playing its part.

        • JohnAZ May 10, 2021 at 11:48 pm #

          Agreed!

          • MaryV May 11, 2021 at 12:36 am #

            Yet, with this scheme in motion, you still trust them with your health.

        • MrMangoOnMyShoulder May 11, 2021 at 7:59 am #

          I remember when CRT just meant a TV.

          I miss those days.

          • MaryV May 11, 2021 at 10:43 am #

            Me too. Oh for the 1970s before people were glued to screens 24/7.

          • Blackbird May 11, 2021 at 12:07 pm #

            I liked making it to the Star-Spangled Banner. Felt like an accomplishment for a grade schooler.

          • O.G. Hawkins May 11, 2021 at 1:58 pm #

            I remember reading The Exorcist and being scared shitless and nothing but snow on both channels.

          • O.G. Hawkins May 11, 2021 at 1:59 pm #

            And, ya, Mr M, I also think Cathode Ray Tube everytime I read CRT.

      • Tekapo May 11, 2021 at 12:37 am #

        What the heck is going on? Where is all this self glorification coming from? Why the heck do all these jerky corporate boards even care what disparate groups of the country think anyway?

        Presumably because they feel that’s where the Zeitgeist is, and where it’s headed.

        As I have said previously, all corporations are there to maximise shareholder profits, and if they are heavily customer-focused (like Disney or Coke), they will take these steps to be “good”, and to reinforce their social license to operate.

        In the past (to use a broad brush) most corporations were in lock-step with the Republican Party, and supported every policy that was pro-business and squashing consumer rights.

        Things changed with consumer rights, the women’s liberation movement, and then the environment movement – so this embracing of socially acceptable “wokism” is not out of line with a past history of strategic shifts.

        The “triple bottom line” is nothing new … big corporations are strategic in real time – it’s why they remain successful.

      • Sean Coleman May 11, 2021 at 9:31 am #

        JAZ “I remember that the purpose of every corporation is to make profit, right? What the heck is going on?”

        This is exactly what some people having been talking aobut of late, or in Matthew R Johnson’s case, for years.

        I think the argument goes that the division between politics and big business has vanished, with top personnel moving back and forth between the two. I get the feeling that the corporations are dictating what happens during this so-called ‘covid crisis’, where your freedom to live a free life will not be constrained so much by government as by business.

        I remember when Ireland went through an insane property bubble which burst in 2008. Our government guaranteed the banks, all bust but in turn the EU did not bail our government out but rather insisted that we dealt with the IMF. I think essentially we were being forced to deal with the private owners of money.

        Another example would be a week or so ago, when Russia offered to supply its own cheap vaccine to Europe. I think Austria ordered 10m doses. (By the way, I do not see it as necessary as there is nothing to vaccinate against and the drug companies are only guessing at what they think is pathogen, SARSCov2 having never been isolated and shown to cause the disease Covid19, which itself is wholly imaginary and indistinguishable from existing diseases. but I digress.) The EU indignantly rejected Russian assistance and Putin mocked them. Why so? Had they been taken prisoner of the pharmaceutical lobby?

        If you look back in history you can see it has always been going on, only it is worse now and harder to hide. Or they cannot be bothered trying too hard to hide it, relying on the blunt instrument of internet censorship.

        Johnson and E Michael Jones consider the present time to be a full-blown Oligarchy. They are quite willing to lose money (eg I understand Hollywood has lost out heavily to online films), at least in the short term as long as their political objectives are met, which will in any case ensure their long-term economic interests anyway.

        But why are the corporations so left-wing and multi-cultural. There you have to look at the history of the Jews. A hundred years ago wealthy NY banker Jacob Schiff, for example, was hailed by the Bolsheviks (almost all Jews at the highest level, according to Solzhenitsyn) as a ‘proletarian’ while a poor Ukranian priest would be shot as a ‘class enemy’.

        If you accept the surface definitions of left and right, rich and poor, at face value it makes no sense at all. if you look at the Jewish role then it does make sense, at least to a degree. Sorry to be so blunt. But at least most people will not make it to the end of this post so they will not be triggered.

        You can find Johnson’s podcasts via the Orthodox Russian Nationalist website (via Radio Albion website) where he mainly talks about geopolitics. I am not Russian Orthodox myself, by the way, but RC.

        • Sean Coleman May 11, 2021 at 9:38 am #

          This is a nice short summary on YouTube of Antony Sutton’s work https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BaJ-k4AB7M0&list=PLpUAbNK9GAkH3msOJ0q1j_782vs_oHsuI&index=22

          Sutton’s research showed that the USA had built the Soviet Union, literally. GE built their electricity grid, for example. Even their five-year plans were written in America. There is a good lecture (or two) by Sutton on YT but I do not have the link to hand. Really, it is just one example followed by another of this happening, over and over again, until n the end you submit and accept his thesis, strange as it may seem.

          Which is where you came in: “What the heck is going on?”

        • Sean Coleman May 11, 2021 at 9:42 am #

          An interesting exercise would be to list the corporations who made lavish donations to BLM and Antifa so that they could destroy American cities. I understand there are many. I seem to recall Apple being one. It makes no sense on the surface.

          • MaryV May 11, 2021 at 11:50 am #

            Nike’s another. I’m sure there are 100s.

          • Blackbird May 11, 2021 at 12:16 pm #

            Others have already done the work for us Sean. There are many lists out there. I did a quick search just for fun. Picked what I assumed was a pro-Burn, Loot, Murder site: Elle. I wasn’t disappointed.

            A few of the courageous corporations:
            Lipslut, Boy Smells, Pretty Little Thing.
            And of course some heavy hitters:
            Amazon, YouTube.

            Plus there as an added bonus you get to read a “statement” by non other than Big Mike! Bitching about evil whitey killing off all these wonderful Community Members.

            The things I do for you people…

          • Sean Coleman May 11, 2021 at 4:45 pm #

            Thanks Blackbird. Some of those I have heard of. The thing to note for anyone reading it is that Boy George (Soroa) is not really an exception. I remember the Fox infobabe telling a open0mouthed Gingrich that George’s name was not to be mentioned.

            That short clip I link to above about Antony Sutton, from Didymus’s YT channel, is outstanding. He expresses his continued astonishment and shock every time he thinks about the sheer scale of Western aid to the Soviets. Like so much, everything else, conventional history is a mile wide of the mark.

            Carrol Quigley is another one to look at.

          • Sean Coleman May 11, 2021 at 4:47 pm #

            I remember Mad Mike now. Colin Flaherty used to quote him all the time. When you ringers get united kill the po-leece mother-huggers.

          • Blackbird May 11, 2021 at 5:39 pm #

            Every time I read Tragedy and Hope, I learn something new. Sutton is informative too, but I’ve barely scratched the surface of his work.

            The more i dig into the story of WWII, the more it looks like a set up to polarize the world into communist vs. capitalist (left hand and right hand). During the Chamberlain years, the UK seemed to be building up Germany to take on the Soviet Union. The UK even bullied the French into joining them in an expeditionary force to fight the USSR in Finland. Unfortunately (maybe), the Finns signed a ceasefire with the USSR before the Brits could get there. Could have been a whole different war if the UK and France were fighting the USSR. Armistice with Germany? Alliance against the Soviet Union? Guess we’ll never know.

            Once Churchill took Chamberlain’s seat, the UK went pro-Soviet, fighting the Huns with one hand while giving aid to the Ruskies with the other. (Where was the USSR during the Battle of Britain? Playing footsie with the Third Reich – while also, it appears, planning to invade western Europe.) Of course Roosevelt was pro-Soviet to the core. They gave eastern Europe to the USSR at Yalta (in fact probably long before), then cried that an “Iron Curtain” had descended.

            WWII was also a war of US vs. UK. (Battle of Bretton Woods)

            The winners of WWII: The US, the USSR, and Israel.
            The losers: UK, Germany, and just about everybody else.

          • Sean Coleman May 12, 2021 at 9:54 am #

            Blackbird

            That is interesting. I only just heard about Quigley let alone read him. I think it was the book you mention that the publishers (MacMillan) pulled out of issuing the second edition, much to Quigley’s disappointment, seeing as it was all ready to go.

            And then Finland. As if it was not already confusing enough. Definitely I get the impression that Churchill wanted war against Germany, come what may. Hitchens believes this was the one(?) great thing Churchill did, but he also believes in the Holocaust. David Irving, as I recall, argued that Chruchill wanted war come what may9, and not for any particularly good reason. I think it is E Michael Jones who said that Chruchill was personally in hock up to his neck with the Jewish banks.

          • Blackbird May 12, 2021 at 11:18 am #

            Sean, I think Churchill was a willing tool of the City of London who set up the bipolar cold war world to benefit them and himself. If it had been me in the Honkey Chateau instead of Barry-O, I’d have returned the bust of Winnie too – but after busting his nose off.

          • Sean Coleman May 13, 2021 at 9:53 am #

            And I hear his behaviour at his pubic (ie posh private) school was so bad it was almost beyond belief.

        • Sean Coleman May 11, 2021 at 9:48 am #

          It is counter-intuitive as in the unlikely formulas used in statistics or steering into a skid to correct it rather than the way which comes naturally. Unless he disciplines himself to learn the basic history a man (I use the word to cover all people) will simply forget it after a week or too and return to being puzzled.

          I think the information was simply suppressed in the past. It did not have to be blatant censorship, as happened behind the Iron Curtain, but rather the subject was avoided in polite society.

        • Yohannon May 11, 2021 at 11:54 am #

          Well said, Sean. Capitalism/Communism are one system, opposite sides of the one coin with Capitalism as the heads. In its mature form, Capitalism is trans-national and ultimately anti-national just like Communism. The Banks are the “elder brothers” who got there first. Or they always were there, for ages and ages.

          Solzhenitsyn wasn’t for any pogroms but rather for charity. But that doesn’t mean we let the Bankers continue to hurt us and our nations.

          • Blackbird May 11, 2021 at 12:18 pm #

            No pogroms? Whatever happened to “Tradition!”?

          • Yohannon May 11, 2021 at 12:35 pm #

            You’re batting zero lately. You people have your own sick little traditions of White guilt, and putting Women in charge of the Armed Forces. You should be living in Sweden.

            In Christian terms, you have left the fleshpots of Egypt, but refuse to keep on moving into the Promised Land. You are wandering around the barren no man’s land of the Sinai desert.

            You are racially conscious, at least to some degree. But you don’t have the clarity to understand the implications of that. You still want things to be like they were in your youth – forgetting that that was a rapidly dying culture. You weren’t aware of that. You were a kid and then a teenager. Life was good.

            If we somehow (but how?) could go back to the 70’s or 80’s we’d just end up back here in a few short years. Likewise, if one part of Red America managed to breakaway, unless it controlled its borders, it would be inundated by minorities in a few short years.

            You need to shock yourself somehow. Maybe play with electricity? Or buy a rubber hammer and hit yourself in the head with it. And of course there are the traditional methods of fasting, hairshirts, and scourging.

          • Blackbird May 11, 2021 at 1:07 pm #

            “You talkin’ to me?”

          • Blackbird May 11, 2021 at 1:08 pm #

            Reading sideways again Yo. Careful, those paper cuts to the eye are painful.

          • Yohannon May 11, 2021 at 1:20 pm #

            I can see you on the beach in the desert, plopped down on your lawn chair with the big umbrella. Now and then you go for a dip in the sea of sand, doing the breast stroke.

          • Blackbird May 11, 2021 at 1:48 pm #

            I do a little remote viewing too…

            Time to put some air in that left front tire, don’t ya think? Wash it off first, the neighbor’s dog just peed on it.

          • Yohannon May 11, 2021 at 9:44 pm #

            You know about Blacks, but would be outraged at the idea of us doing anything it.

            You know about Churchill and the Evil he represented, but are outraged that the Germans tried to save themsleves.

            You need to quite the Dark and seek the Light.

          • Blackbird May 12, 2021 at 8:52 am #

            Yoho, I don’t know whose mind you’re spelunking, but it ain’t mine.

          • Blackbird May 12, 2021 at 11:24 am #

            And since we’re here…

            I would be curious to read your solution to the race problem in the US, but I don’t want you to have to change your nom de guerre again. You seem to be near the bottom of that barrel. (Gotta admit, I’m also curious to know what war crime led to the execution of Feldwebel Skorzeny…)

          • Yohannon May 13, 2021 at 3:49 pm #

            “My” solution? I desire what the great Statesmen have desired. I follow in their train. My solution indeed. You are going in the wrong direction.

            Here, take this golden threat: Monticello.org

  50. JohnAZ May 10, 2021 at 11:24 pm #

    So the only conclusion I is that we cannot believe anything we read.

    Great. The first order item, the transmission of new cases in the US is dropping like a rock. Make your own conclusions why? The CDC is no help.

    • MaryV May 10, 2021 at 11:33 pm #

      Jesus. How many times do we have to say the number of cases is bullshit?

      The PCR test does not work.

      There are no cases. There are people with a cold or the flu like always.

      More in the winter, goes away in the summer.

      Not rocket science.

      But when a massive global marketing scheme is attached – suddenly natural laws no longer matter.

      Ridiculous!

      Regardless, no ‘cases’ will go up (e.g. flawed test bullshit to begin with), but actual people sick and dead from the jab.

      Mission accomplished.

      • JohnAZ May 10, 2021 at 11:42 pm #

        Sorry, MaryV. After watching the ups and downs for a year, the trends are real. Each case may not be accurate, but the incidence of positives have definitely followed trends. You want to ignore that, fine. Not me. The good news is that the crud is being forced into a box, hopefully to disappear.

        • JohnAZ May 10, 2021 at 11:44 pm #

          And just because you and some folks on the blog think that the crud does not exist makes absolutely no difference to the little hair balls that keeps invading and sickening folks all over the world. You are entitled to your opinion, I am mine.

          • MaryV May 11, 2021 at 12:35 am #

            Whoever said you weren’t entitled to your opinion?

            I just don’t understand why you deny factual data.

        • MaryV May 11, 2021 at 12:27 am #

          I recognize there is a flu and cold season every year.

          I know that the nobel-prize winning scientist who created the PCR test has said it should not be used for what it is used for, and that it returns 97% false-positives.

          A ‘case’ is anyone who tests ‘false positive’ and some people test over and over every week.

          So it’s bullshit.

      • JohnAZ May 10, 2021 at 11:46 pm #